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12 triplogs
Jun 02 2020
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Coyote GulchSouthwest, UT
Southwest, UT
Backpack avatar Jun 02 2020
whycoyote
Backpack8.00 Miles 500 AEG
Backpack8.00 Miles1 Day         
500 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
_____________________
Jun 01 2020
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Coyote Gulch via Hurricane WashSouthwest, UT
Southwest, UT
Backpack avatar Jun 01 2020
whycoyote
Backpack11.20 Miles 1,080 AEG
Backpack11.20 Miles3 Days         
1,080 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Lovely 2 night backpack with a group of friends. There were 10 of us. Camped near the Jacob Hamblin Arch and day hiked down to the pictographs. Lots of wading, reading, and relaxing.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
Jan 05 2019
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Bluff Springs Trail #235Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Backpack avatar Jan 05 2019
whycoyote
Backpack3.30 Miles 1,015 AEG
Backpack3.30 Miles
1,015 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Bluff Springs, Dutchman, Terrapin Loop
Bluff Springs and Dutchman to Charlebois Spring, then Dutchman to Terrapin to Bluff Springs out (~15 miles). It was a nice, cool hike in on Saturday. No hurry, no worry, just a nice stroll in with great views of the mountains. It was pretty easy on the feet, and once we hit the Dutchman Trail at Crystal Spring (very low) we left other hikers behind on the shorter loop trails. There was a party camped at La Barge Canyon, but we ended up having Charlebois Spring (high output and deep pool, as usual) all to ourselves.
The rain started right on schedule about 2000 on Saturday and continued for 12 hours, until just after we broke camp and started out on the Dutchman. One of my hiking partners, who shall remain nameless, chose the route out. This was after I told him "please, as flat as possible." His skill for choosing the opposite of that, and a grueling hike out will not go unrewarded at some future date. :x
With all the rain the washes were flowing, waterfalls were flowing out of the walls, and the trails were flowing. It was an incredible hike to the tailhead (except for the straight uphill that never ended). :lol: I can definitely see why you would want to do Terrapin from THE OTHER END. Weaver's Needle [ photo ] was enshrouded in an ever-changing robe of mist, dewdrops the size of marbles clung to grasses at the side of the trail, and the sound of rushing water accompanied much of my solitary trek up and over the Terrapin Trail. My treks are often solitary, even when hiking in a group, because my pace can be best described as glacier-like.
I arrived at the Terrapin/Bluff Springs junction about 1/2 hour after the rest of the group had continued down Bluff Springs. All was good until coming out at the Peralta trailhead at around 1445. Shep met me at the trailhead and asked if I had seen Mark (name changed to protect the possibly embarrassed). Being the last one out, I SHOULD have seen Mark. Shep had last seen him on the downhill after the Terrapin junction. We decided that Shep should hike back in to see if he could find Mark, while I held down the fort at the trailhead. As hikers returned from the Bluff Springs trail they stopped to talk to me, letting me know that Shep was on the trail asking after our missing hiker. No one had seen Mark. When Shep returned around 1730 we decided to call for help. We hadn't been on this trail before, Mark had not responded to Shep calling for him, the washes were running pretty good, and we didn't want to leave Mark out all night when we didn't know if he had gotten turned around or could be hurt. We left a note on Mark’s car, then drove out a ways to get a signal, and Shep called 911. The dirt portion of Peralta Road was horrendous, and we conducted some of the drive sideways in my Outback. After talking to 911 we decided to head out to the first warm looking location we could find to await a call back from the Sheriff.
The Sheriff did a lot to ease our minds about the fate of Mark. When hearing that we had not hiked Bluff Springs before, the Sheriff was confident that Mark had taken a wrong turn down Barks Canyon. This did a lot to ease my mind, as I tend to imagine the worst.
Shep and I did a lot of waiting, eating, drinking of coffee, and worrying as the search was organized. At around 2000, we called the Sheriff to get a status report. He told us that a helicopter was being deployed and the searchers were starting up the trail. At around 2200, the Sheriff called to report Mark found, and back at the trailhead. It would be the next day before I heard the rest of the story.
Mark reported that he had indeed gotten off trail, due to some cairns that mislead a hiker into Barks Canyon. Since there is no trail there, I’d like to know WTF people are doing placing cairns at this critical juncture. Not having seen them, this is all I’m going to say.
Mark did realize that he was off trail and set up camp as darkness fell. He was warm, cozy, and asleep when the helicopter woke him, and was not able to get outside his tent soon enough to get their attention on the first pass. The second pass saw Mark found and brought out, but the story gets a bit more interesting.
Mark reports that the rescuers told him that sometime during their search for him they found a day hiker who had also gotten off trail, was not equipped to spend the night out, and had not reported that he was going to be out on the trail to anyone. This hiker was cold and wet, and was rescued by the helicopter that was deployed to find Mark. I’ll let you draw your own conclusions as to what might have been the day hiker’s fate if Mark had not also gotten off trail that day.
Lessons learned: 1. Don’t let “X” plan your hike out if you have decided to change plans mid-backpack.
2. Hike with a buddy (DUH!)
3. You never know if your rescue might save someone else’s life.
Fauna
Fauna
Tarantula
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
There were sparse wildflowers, believe it or not! I definitely saw Globemallow, and one California Poppy.
_____________________
Apr 14 2018
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Granite Mountain Trail #261Prescott, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 14 2018
whycoyote
Hiking8.20 Miles 1,700 AEG
Hiking8.20 Miles   5 Hrs   15 Mns   2.19 mph
1,700 ft AEG   1 Hour   30 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This was a Three Bears hike. Not too hot, not too cold. Not too much up, not too much down. Not too windy, ... you get the picture. This beautiful Saturday in mid April and we only saw seven other people on the trail. Two weren't even going to the top, they were just headed to a crag near Lizard Head for some rock climbing.
Culture
Culture
PaleoRob Pose
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
There were a couple, and I mean just a couple.
_____________________
Mar 30 2018
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Secret Canyon Trail #121Sedona, AZ
Sedona, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 30 2018
whycoyote
Hiking7.00 Miles 400 AEG
Hiking7.00 Miles
400 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
It was time to get out again, and this easy, but beautiful, little backpack was just the ticket. We arrived at the trailhead around 11 am on Friday. There were lots of people walking on Dry Creek Road, fortunately for us seekers of solitude they were headed to Devil's Bridge. We found five vehicles at the trailhead, and passed three groups of people who were coming out. Three down, two to go,, but we never saw any sign of those other two. They must have been hiking the loop and went out Bear Sign. There is no water to speak of in Secret Canyon. There were a few pools of fairly clear water that could be used in an emergency. I test filtered about 32 oz. from one pool, and it came out slightly colored but tasted OK. We didn't actually use it for anything.

This was the busiest I have ever seen this trail. On Saturday, while taking a side hike up David Miller we saw one couple with two dogs. On Secret Canyon we saw three groups of two. One had backpacks and the others passed back out later in the afternoon.

Given that it was Easter weekend, we felt luck for the relative peace and quiet and unobtrusive hikers who passed by our campsite about 1/2 mile in Secret Canyon. We could have done without the helicopters.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
A few Redstem Storksbill and Spring Parsley. The Manzanita was in full bloom.

dry Secret Canyon Dry Dry
Dry except for pools of standing water that are varied in depth and will probably be dry soon.
_____________________
Oct 01 2016
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
West Clear Creek Trail #17Camp Verde, AZ
Camp Verde, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 01 2016
whycoyote
Hiking8.20 Miles 2,741 AEG
Hiking8.20 Miles
2,741 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I tagged along with my backpacking group to make this a short day hike. The trail head parking held only 2 other cars when we arrived, including some quail hunters. It was a little disconcerting to watch them head down the trail with their shotguns. The canyon didn't seem conducive to hiking and hunting, but we didn't see or hear them again.

We left the trail head about 9:30 am, the destination being a sweet camp site a little ways after the 3rd crossing. The trail starts out in a wooded area, then heads slightly uphill for a short way. Then this easy trail heads into the canyon with a straight, narrow, and flat approach to the first crossing. One of our party decided to attempt the very small log to keep his feet dry. That didn't work. If you are hiking this trail, just bring along a pair of sandals, or plan on hiking in wet boots. After the second crossing it started to rain a little, which was a nice relief as this exposed section of trail would be really hot in the direct sun. In no time we were at the third crossing, and then at camp.

My companion and I had a snack, hung around for a little, then headed back the way we came. There were more people along the creek, enjoying the sun and water, as we came back. The exposed areas were a little warmer with the sun out, but the temp was cool enough that it was still comfortable. We ended up on the "higher" trail and passed the cool rock building we did not see on the way in. Our trail following skills are obviously lacking, but it was OK since it came out in the same place.

The parking lot was packed when we arrived back at our car, with overflow onto the side of the road. We were asked several times where the "swimming hole" is. Unfortunately we weren't able to provide any information other than "the entire creek is beautiful, you'll be find wherever you end up."

This was a great ~5 mile hike. The weather was great, the little bit of rain refreshing. We saw a tarantula on the trail but no other wildlife. We finished our hike, as we do all hikes in this area, with a burger and refreshment at the Verde Brewing Company. :y: Happy trails.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation None
No change yet at this low elevation.
_____________________
1 archive
Sep 18 2016
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Secret MeadowFlagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 18 2016
whycoyote
Hiking2.40 Miles 980 AEG
Hiking2.40 Miles   1 Hour      2.40 mph
980 ft AEG   1 Hour    Break5 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This is a sweet little hike that is completely off trail up the steep side of a cinder cone. Other routes showed hikers going straight up, then straight down. I tried to put a little switchback in our hike.

This was the first time I was using Route Scout to track a hike, so after messing around with it a little we set off around 9am. The cinders were an interesting challenge, as was the elevation. I was hiking at 3,000 ft. above where I live, and my hiking partner was at double that. We both got winded and had to rest periodically, using that time to admire the sweeping views from Red Butte to the northwest and the San Francisco Peaks to the southeast.

Coming up the last steep section onto the rim of the cinder cone was exhilarating. At the rim the abundant wildflowers were beautiful. Strolling along the edge and looking into the meadow was thoroughly enjoyable. We decided not to go down into the meadow at this point as time was limited. As we traversed the rim we decided to make our way down where there were trees, to see how that slope was. It was just as steep!

This area is pristine and hopefully it will remain that way. Be respectful and leave no trace if you decide to do this hike.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
This hike yielded no autumn colors. The rest of the area had very isolated change on aspens.
_____________________
Sep 04 2016
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Loy Canyon Trail #5Sedona, AZ
Sedona, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 04 2016
whycoyote
Hiking5.25 Miles 1,930 AEG
Hiking5.25 Miles
1,930 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Our group of 5 from the Prescott Backpacking Meetup group got on the trail around 9:30 am on Saturday of this Labor Day weekend. Shortly into the hike we ran into one couple coming down and never saw another person on the trail until we were within a mile of the trail head the next day.

This was a tough hike for me. I'd been losing weight using a low carb diet for the past 3 weeks and foolishly did not carb up before leaving. Suffice it to say it was a tough 7.5 miles for me to the campsite up past Secret Cabin. The switchbacks were their own brand of hell, but with the encouragement of my group I made it.

The beginning of the trail through many wildflowers and zooming hummingbirds was delightful. As we began climbing into the trees we saw one rattlesnake who very courteously announced his presence with a loud rattle. The trail is smooth and clear up to this point with a few rocky wash crossing, but not much in the way of obstruction.

Starting up the switchbacks the rocks become more prevalent, and the grade increases. My distress was such, from the steep trail and direct sun, that I really don't remember much up to the first campsite on the side of the canyon. From there the going gets easier for a little bit until the last climb to the saddle. There are some rocks that require big steps, or hands and feet if you are as exhausted as I was. Fortunately, some carb loading via Gatorade, cookies made by Linda, and a Fruit and Grain bar from Jeff kept me on my feet.

The saddle was a wonderful site to see. Back in the shade and on my back with legs up a tree trunk for a short rest. Then, up again on the Secret Mountain trail until it levels off (1/4 mile?) and starts a meandering downhill towards Secret Cabin. All I could think of at this point was "I've got to go back up this tomorrow! :scared: After passing the cabin the trails climbs up a few hundred yards to a level area with a beautiful view of the Verde Valley. We set up camp here and spent a wonderful night beneath the stars.

Our final companion, Shep, joined us at around 11:30 pm after starting at the trail head at 6:30 pm. He did almost the entire hike in the dark and we were amazed to wake up in the morning to see his yellow tent pitched nearby! :o

The next day coming down was easier, but by no means easy. Climbing back down the switchbacks over the rocks, in the sun again, was a different challenge. At least this time my body wasn't screaming for fuel. More bars and half a bagel from Jeff made sure of that.

Coming down out of the switchbacks into the shade of the Ponderosa was wonderful and it was an easy downhill stroll from there. Nearing the end of the trail we ran into a couple of hikers, and could hear the quads and ATVs roaring up and down the dirt roads as we approached. Back to civilization, eh?
Culture
Culture
Hammock
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial
Substantial wildflowers for the first 3 miles or so of the trail.
_____________________
Dec 05 2014
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Cave Creek / Skunk Tank LoopPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Backpack avatar Dec 05 2014
whycoyote
Backpack9.90 Miles 1,120 AEG
Backpack9.90 Miles1 Day   4 Hrs      
1,120 ft AEG   1 Hour    Break37 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
We did the Skunk Tank portion first, which ended up being a great idea. The trail is rocky and I always find it easier to go up really rocky trails. Starting at the Cave Creek Trail head parking lot we quickly made our way over to the creek, where we promptly lost our bearings. Sometimes it's not good to rely on memory instead of just following the beaten path. After spending about 20 minutes searching the creek for the trail crossing we got back on the trail and almost immediately came upon the crossing, complete with signage! Following the CC trail to the Skunk Tank junction was pretty easy. As we turned off the trail continued pretty level for a short time, then began to climb. As we reached the first saddle the trail leveled off and all signs of civilization disappeared, except for the big white FAA radar thingie. The mountains around us were beautiful and the view spectacular. The traverse across the edge of the formation to the right (no idea if it has a name) was an easy stroll with more gorgeous views. We saw some potholes in the washes, but no running water. There was no water that we could see in Skunk Tank. The traverse across the edge of the formation to the right (no idea if it has a name) was an easy stroll with more gorgeous views. As the trail started in the switchbacks down to the junction with Cave Creek Trail it became rocky again. It isn't as bad as the Skunk Tank section, though, so I'm glad we did that first. At the junction you start hiking by the creek again and the going is easy. We camped about 1/2 mile from the junction. In the morning the hike out was quick and easy, so I'm pretty sure that 5.5 miles listed on the sign at the junction is WAYYYY off. This was a great little hike and a perfect way to get back into backpacking after so many years off.
Fauna
Fauna
Tarantula
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Light
In the wet areas the foliage was nice, though a bit past it's prime.
_____________________
Oct 09 2010
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Hart PrairieFlagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 09 2010
whycoyote
Hiking14.25 Miles 1,102 AEG
Hiking14.25 Miles
1,102 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners 12 partners
HAZ - Event
azsol
chumley
cindyl
fotogirl53
Hikergirl81
hippiepunkpirate
JoelHazelton
Jonnybackpack
juliachaos
rwstorm
Scoutcity
tibber
This was a wonderful trip with a bunch of great people.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Light
_____________________
Oct 14 2007
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Abineau - Bear Jaw LoopFlagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 14 2007
whycoyote
Hiking7.00 Miles 2,115 AEG
Hiking7.00 Miles   6 Hrs   30 Mns   1.08 mph
2,115 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
My trip was cut a little short so it's not the full 7 miles. Well, it is if you count the short-haul.

Early on Sunday there was hardly any traffic heading up to Flagstaff.
The weather was beautiful, sunny and about 60. Gaining elevation as I
drove north on the freeway the trees alongside the road changed from
scrubby pinyon and juniper to the taller and majestic ponderosa pines.
The air cooled and took on the "sweet vanilla pine" smell of Arizona
forest.

Turning off paved road onto FR151 the Toyota bumped and jostled over a
cattle guard. Almost there! The parking lot at the trail head had a
few cars, and one couple were putting sunscreen on their faces before
heading up the trail. I smiled and waved as I drove by, but got
nothing but a stare in return. "Huh," I thought, "they must be from
back east." It never fails to amaze me when people aren't friendly out
here. How can you be anything but happy when you're about to head off
up an incredible trail?

I check my backpack and get started. A little way up the trail splits,
Bear Jaw to the left and Abineau to the right. I've already decided on
going to the right. Abineau is much steeper than BJ, and very rocky.
I'd rather go up steep and rocky than down. But what's this? A sign
that says the trail is impassable? We'll see about
that! No one has mentioned that you can't get around the loop, and the
sign-in log shows people making the loop in the days and weeks prior
to today. So, up I head. The trail is as beautiful as I remember, only
more so because now it is covered in brilliant golden aspen leaves.
For a couple of hours there is no sign that anyone else exists on this
earth. All of a sudden I see what "avalanche conditions" means. The
trail has been obliterated by piles of downed trees. It's been long
enough, though, that the trail now continues around and above the
devastation. Many people, it seems, have not let the avalanche stop
them from completing this challenging hike. After clearing the piles
of trees I stop for lunch. While I'm sitting in the sun enjoying the
view of Arizona stretching for miles to the north an older couple
comes along up the trail from behind me. They stop to chat for a
little. They are concerned that I'm hiking alone and I explain the
cell phone signal and that I am always VERY cautious. They continue
onward as I pack up my trash and take a last long look at the vista.

I'm almost to the top of Abineau now (3 miles and 1900 feet in
elevation gain). Just a little bit more and then there is the pipeline
road which connects Abineau and BJ. Pipeline road is a breeze to hike
being slightly downhill and very wide and flat. After about 1 1/2
miles the Bear Jaw trail meets up with pipeline. Heading back into the
trees I know I'm on the home stretch. As the trail heads down it is
steep and rocky in parts, but nothing like the Abineau. About 1/2 mile
down it evens out a little, but is still rocky. This is were I run
into trouble. I'm just striding along at a pretty good pace when my
foot slips on the scree in the trail. I catch myself and make note to
be a little more careful. Slipping on loose rock is an everyday
occurrence on AZ trails. It happens every time I hike, and sometimes
the result is me sitting on my butt in the middle of the trail looking
more than a little sheepish. Not four or five steps later I slip
again, this time I'm not lucky enough to catch my balance. My left leg
slides forward as the toe of my right boot is caught by a rock and
held back. As I head downward I twist my body trying to pull my right
leg out from under me, to no avail. As my weight comes down on my leg
I can feel and hear the crunching and tearing of my ankle which is
twisted because my foot was caught. Like lightening I pull my leg out
from under me to be greeted by the sight of my foot hanging from my
leg at a really strange angle. Not good, I think, not good at all. I
give voice to my anguish with a very loud "NOOOOOO, OH NO NO NO NO
NO!" This causes me to suddenly stop and glance around hoping no one
was close enough to hear, then immediately hope someone was.
Fortunately my cell phone is in my pocket within easy reach. "911 what
is your emergency?" "I've fallen on the Bear Jaw trail and broken my
ankle." This was followed by questions, a detailed explanation of how
to get to the trail, and my location on said trail. After about
fifteen minutes the WHUP WHUP WHUP of a helicopter can be heard. A
sheriff's dispatcher calls me back on my cell so that we can direct
the helicopter to my location. So, have you ever sat in the middle of
a trail watching a helicopter try to locate you? It's pretty
frustrating. I'm watching the helicopter, telling the dispatcher where
it is in respect to me, and the dispatcher is trying to relay the info
to the chopper. This takes about 15 minutes.

After spotting me the chopper hovers overhead and the pilot leans out
the door and waves. I wave back. Off they head to scout the area.
After a little while I realize I can no longer hear the whup of the
blades. Hmmmm...My cell phone rings and it is Dana the dispatcher to
let me know there is no place for them to land and they've headed back
to Flagstaff to pick up the short-haul expert. I look at my phone and
see that it has been approximately 35 minutes since the fall. Just
then I hear jingling and a golden retriever and long haired black mutt
swarm around me. Their owner is a dark haired woman who asks me why
I'm sitting in the middle of the trail. My reply is "cause my ankle is
broken." This question and answer session is repeated three more times
as other hikers arrive on the scene. When the cute black dog trips
over my foot and changes the angle of it by about 20 degrees the dark
haired woman decides it's time she and her dogs move on down the
trail.

Four people stay with me. They are Joe & Susan, both business college professors at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff and a couple from Flagstaff. The woman in the couple is a nursing student and she is very upset that she can't do anything for me. Later I will find out her name is Liz. I never found
out the name of the man. Liz tells me they are 27 and 30
years old and about to be married. These four wonderful people stay
with me until the chopper comes back about 2 hours later. Liz and her
guy aren't really dressed for cooler weather and the sun is going
behind the mountain. Even though I try to talk them into it, they
won't leave. Joe and Susan give me some ibuprofen and start making sure I'm comfortable, pulling out my hat, gloves and space blanket and bundling me up. That shows I wasn't really thinking as clearly as I thought. I had ibuprofen in my pack,
but never even thought to take it. I didn't even remember it was there!

We sit around making small talk (mostly initiated by the others). As
the adrenaline starts wearing off the pain in my ankle gets worse and
worse. I'm trying to stay alert and involved in the conversation but
eventually end up lying back with my eyes closed just listening.

Again the whup whup is heard over the trees and leaves and dirt start
flying. Susan & Joe rush over to wrap the space blankets around me and
cover me against the onslaught of debris being thrown over us. (They
were so great.)

So there I am, huddled with Susan & Joe as dust and leaves are whipped
around us by the helicopter's downdraft. Suddenly the buffeting stops
and I look up and there stands the most beautiful sight, a guy in an
orange jumpsuit. He yells out "Hey, can somebody come pack this rope
up for me?" and Joe heads down at a trot. Mr. Orange Jumpsuit spends
what seems like forever unhooking and hooking and packing and
unpacking before he comes over to take a look at me. "Hi" he says,
"I'm Mark." "Well, hi, Mark" I say, "it's very, very nice to meet
you."

The next few minutes are spent with Mark asking me questions about
other injuries; did I hit my head - how is my back - hurt anything
else? "No" I am happy to tell him, "it's just my ankle." The moment
I've been dreading arrives, Mark says "I can try to take your boot
off, or we can splint it with the boot on." Now, I'm pretty fond of
those boots, and not really fond of incredible pain, so I choose to
leave the boot on. The splinting goes pretty well, I use my childbirth
breathing with Joe as coach to get through it. Mark promises morphine
when we reach the ambulance.

I am hustled into a seat sling, goggles and helmet and the next thing
I know the helicopter is back hovering overhead. The line from the
helicopter is hooked to me with a carabiner, and Mark hooks himself to
me with another carabiner and suddenly we are airborne. Wow! Straight
up past the trees and suddenly the entire mountain unfolds beneath us,
bathed in the glow of the setting sun. I am captivated by the view and
don't even notice if it's cold or if there is any pain. Too soon we
reach the trail head parking and we are placed ever so gently on the
ground. Again the downdraft whips around us sending dirt and cinders
flying. I will be digging those cinders out of my mouth, nose and ears
for the next two days.

I'm lying on the ground and another helmet encased head appears upside
down above me. "Hi" this head says, "I'm Scott." Wow, these rescue
guys are polite I think. Scott has a partner whose name is Kira. Kira,
Scott, Mark and a sheriff's deputy lift me into a gurney and then into
the waiting ambulance. Whew, I think, this is almost over.

On the ride to the hospital I learn that morphine has absolutely no effect on me except make my mouth REALLY dry. In the emergency room I find out that fentanyl works EXCEPTIONALLY well as a pain reliever. The doc says that surgery is required and I sign the release. I'm just glad to not be lying in the middle of that trail anymore. :o
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Apr 01 2007
whycoyote
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 72
 Triplogs 13

60 female
 Joined Jul 02 2002
 Prescott VAlley,
Grapevine Springs Canyon Trail #4Prescott, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 01 2007
whycoyote
Hiking3.50 Miles 870 AEG
Hiking3.50 Miles   5 Hrs      0.70 mph
870 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Nice Sunday stroll. Even the 11 yr old was impressed with the scenery on this beautiful day. If you stay with the creek on the left, instead of going right when the trail climbs high, there are many fantastic rock formations, water falls and Tolkienesque landscapes. The upper trail comes back to the creek after the fenced area.
_____________________
average hiking speed 1.59 mph

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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