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Mount Ord Birding Loop, AZ
mini location map2020-04-30
8 by photographer avatarseanpeters
photographer avatar
 
Mount Ord Birding Loop, AZ 
Mount Ord Birding Loop, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Apr 30 2020
seanpeters
Hiking7.20 Miles
Hiking7.20 Miles   5 Hrs   16 Mns   1.37 mph
1 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Thankfully my passion for birding is as strong as it is for climbing. When my original climbing plans were aborted at 3:30am I simply exchanged the ropes and rack with binoculars and a notebook. I arrived at the lower parking lot before the sunrise and warmed up my "birding" ears with a variety of pre-recorded warbler songs and calls that I was hoping to hear and see. Sunrise never disappoints and it was not long before I was greeted with the chirps, buzzes, trills and other melodic noises the songsters begin their day with. Several of the expected birds were observed quickly; Ash-throated Flycatcher, Scott's Oriole, Northern Mockingbird, Raven, Gambel's Quail and Black-chinned Sparrow. The more secretive Crissal Thrasher was discovered further away from the road and in thick shrub cover. A Gray Vireo was heard and then finally seen after some juniper and acacia dodging. I wandered back to the truck and drove a mile and half up the road for some mixed forest adventure and warbler sleuthing.

Immediately after parking I saw the nonstop movement of the Bushtit and Black-throated Gray Warblers in an oak tree. Calls of the Bewick's Wren and Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher were fairly constant throughout the hike. Along the drainages where there tends to be taller pines, oak, sycamores and more understory I could hear the Grace's Warbler high in the pines. With a little patience one of them finally flitted into view and sang loud and close enough to capture a nice sound recording. Four Black-headed Grosbeaks was a nice surprise, quickly followed by a Virginia Warbler. A Plumbeous Vireo sang loud and clear and was quite cooperative as I observed and attempted to record. My off trail bushwhack to the summit of Mt. Ord was highlighted by a sprinting deer that nearly knocked me over.

The thickets of oak and snags hosted an Acorn Woodpecker, Violet-green Swallows, a single Steller's Jay, several Western Bluebirds and a Spotted Towhee. When I reached the road below the fire tower I could see it was occupied. We watched one another through binoculars. At least now I know what a bird must feel like as I observe their lives. On the walk back down the road a White-breasted Nuthatch, Chipping Sparrows, a Northern Flicker, Orange-Crowned Warbler, Dark-eyed Junco and a Zone-Tailed Hawk were sighted.

After today's wanderings I have the distinction of walking, riding a bike, taking a motorcycle, driving a truck and even pushing my son's bike up the roads to the summit.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
Deer, rabbit, rock squirrel, whiptail lizard, horned lizard, Gray Flycatcher (probable)
_____________________
HAZ Member
seanpeters'
8 Photosets

  2020-09-19
  2020-05-25
  2020-04-30
  2020-04-25
  2020-04-22
  2020-04-18
  2020-04-15
  2020-04-08
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