username
X
password
register help
GuidesRoutes
 
Photosets
 
 Comments
triplogs   photosets   labels comments more
1, 2  Next
34 triplogs
Jan 08 2021
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Indian Spring Wash - Bartlett DamPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 08 2021
muskybankr
Hiking12.40 Miles 1,303 AEG
Hiking12.40 Miles   5 Hrs   7 Mns   2.68 mph
1,303 ft AEG      29 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
As many times as we have hiked down and back Indian Spring Wash to the slot canyon cave we’ve never hiked from one end to the other until today when we actually did it twice, up and back. At just about 6 miles, it’s nowhere near as long as we thought it was. For the purists in us, a few days before we also hiked the northern portion of the wash up to Indian Butte, from where it begins and then bushwhacked back, catching #1117 right at the Bartlett Dam Highway. That portion is very short, with no notable scenery, and not really worth mentioning except we did it. Since the highlight on Indian Spring Wash is the bootleg slot canyon, and some may only want to do that, I have laid out the various distances in this table. (Table format does not make its way from the draft to the finished product???)

FROM TO DISTANCE(approx.)
Rio Verde Parking lot to Indian Spring wash 1.0 miles
Indian Spring Wash(south end) to Slot Cyn Cave junction 2.3 miles
Slot cyn cave In and Out 0.3 miles
Slot Cyn Cave Jct to Culvert on Bartlett Dam Rd. 2.75 miles

So, for a 5.8 mile round trip you can access the cave from the culvert(north end), with scenic rock formations much of the way. The wash below the cave is also very nice, at least for a couple of miles down to the home of the Phallus Immanemque cliff dwellers. (see the picture) From there on down to the Verde, the wash becomes more of a delta, flat and wide. We left the wash more than ½ mile before the river to respect the Bald Eagle Breeding Area, which, though it is not marked in the wash, is known to be about ½ mile on either side of the river. There are several parking areas below the dam and we picked one with plenty of extra room about 1 mile from the wash. Taking note of @Eagle’s triplog, we didn’t bother exploring any other canyons and so ran up a GPS total of 12.4 miles.(The GPS itself says 11.99 miles but that's because it samples on an average of 12 seconds vs. my trip computer which averages 5 seconds) Saw no eagles or any other humans on the trail. Our friend, the dead owl, which we have seen on other visits, was still looking fairly chipper and holding court, but this time a little north of the cave junction, rather than south. He must have other friends that take him for a ride. We spooked a small herd of javelinas on the dirt road coming in below the dam just before 9 am. Heading south from the culvert you get one shot of Weaver’s Needle on a sightline right down the middle of the wash. As always, most of the pictures are from Phil, who has a real camera and knows how to use it. I have encouraged him to sign up on HIkeAZ but he's having trouble coming up with a suitable trail name, which I told him was a requirement.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation None
Fair amount of chuparosa near north end. No other wildflowers
_____________________
5 archives
Dec 28 2020
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Indian Spring Wash - Bartlett DamPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 28 2020
muskybankr
Hiking5.80 Miles 673 AEG
Hiking5.80 Miles   3 Hrs   51 Mns   1.83 mph
673 ft AEG      41 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Revisiting the Bootleg slot canyon down Indian Springs Wash and environs. We went to the cave and explored down below that for another .7 miles. No javelina today but a dead owl and hawk?? Met “Mike, the Fireman” down below the cave who has hiked and camped all around this area for sixty years, so far as we could deduce, and told us that the wash down to a road taking you to the dam was easy hiking and not that far so we’ll try and do the entire wash pretty soon from what we are calling Bartlett Lake Rd down to Rio Verde, or close. Unfortunately, the Arizona Topo map calls most of the roads in this area Horseshoe Dam roads which leads to some confusion among those relying on the map. We did discover one better way to access the wash. Historically, we park ¼ mile or so uphill past the culvert and accessing a wash at right angles to Indian Springs, make our way down to the real wash and head south. This involves a great deal of duking it out with the catclaw. Much better to park fairly close to the culvert, and access it from the north side coming in just past the fencing. Otherwise, there was really no catclaw to deal with in the wash. The bamboo forest has extended its reach and is now a couple of forests but they can be bypassed carefully by staying up on the rocks. Since this wash has become more popular, you will discover several auxiliary trails that have been established bypassing insurmountable obstacles in the middle of the wash which were not there when we did this six years ago(the obstacles were there but not the walkarounds). Most of these trails are on the western side of the wash and are not necessarily cairned, which adds to the adventure.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation None
Fremont Cottonwoods a beautiful gold
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation None
a few chuparosa
_____________________
Dec 18 2020
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Cave Creek / Skunk Tank LoopPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 18 2020
muskybankr
Hiking9.90 Miles 1,120 AEG
Hiking9.90 Miles   4 Hrs   45 Mns   2.34 mph
1,120 ft AEG      31 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
37 degrees in Scottsdale, heading to Seven Springs at 8:00 am, where the frog ponds alongside the road were frozen over and it was 34 degrees to start. We like the clockwise direction as it spaces out the 1950 feet of AEG. Likewise we like the parking spots at FR24b(don’t block the road) as those cut off a round trip of about .75 miles. There are apparently several different ways to get to the Skunk Tank trail but we like walking down 24b to the stile across the fence, and then several hundred more feet where you can see a well-cairned trail head off across Cave Creek, and proceed up hill on the other side. This is the Skunk Tank. As we got to the Cottonwood junction with Skunk Tank(0.75 miles) we could feel our frozen fingers again and were surprised to see a new fire trail up to 12 feet wide we could stroll on, we thought, all the way to Trail #4, less than five miles away. We were, of course, wrong. These trails, in the Spur Cross/New River Mesa area offer many big sky views and this one also has the old Quien Sabe mine, that was once rumored to contain some copper. We saw no evidence of that, but then, we’re not mining engineers. One has to be somewhat in awe of these old sourdoughs that walked miles up hill with heavy tools to dig holes in hard ground, literally in the middle of nowhere. After 4.5 miles, the road slid by a gate which ushered us into a cliff-hanging single track providing some awesome views assuming you dared look up from your shoes, since the views started out straight down for 500 feet or more, but the trail did keep going downhill which was good and, at the 6.2 mile mark, we came to the Trail #4 junction, alongside Cave Creek which we followed back uphill 3.8 miles to our parking lot on FR24B. We saw a few cattle and plenty of evidence of horses but no other hikers, bikers or animals. Since this area is said to contain mountain lions, most of us made up some horror stories to encourage our slowest hikers(me) not to lag back too far. The GPS readings come from my trip computer which samples every 5 seconds vs. the trip log which samples about every 12 seconds and totaled 9.6 miles for this trip vs. the trip computer at 10.0 miles. The difference in distance comes mostly from the single track. The photos were all taken by Phil who has an actual camera vs. my toy camera. I didn't realize I even had that setting and why I have it remains a mystery or what buttons I pushed to activate it likewise.
Flora
Flora
Saguaro - Crested
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation None
Pretty nice a week ago coming back down seven springs road, today not quite so brilliant.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation None
none
_____________________
Dec 11 2020
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Bronco Trail #245Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 11 2020
muskybankr
Hiking7.40 Miles 1,292 AEG
Hiking7.40 Miles   3 Hrs   20 Mns   2.47 mph
1,292 ft AEG      20 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I noticed that HikeAZ gives me no credit for hiking any of the six trails around Seven Springs although we have hiked most of them for years and years, just never posted them. I guess they're not mindreaders. Since we’ve been somewhat shut out of the AZ Trail, which we were approaching in a day tripping, piecemeal fashion, by Mother Nature, wild fires, closures and deadfalls, we opted to rehike the trails up around Seven Springs. We’ve done most of these with the exception of the Quien Sabe trail which is a bit too much like the AZ Trail to be hiked by seniors. So today, we rehiked the old Bronco Trail out to Cottonwood and back. We got about .5” of rain yesterday which was needed except when your boots are full of mud and you’re slipping and sliding along slogging uphill carrying mud, you don’t think about the beneficial aspects of rain. The vistas from the trail are all wonderful and the weather was perfect (37 degrees to start, about 57 to finish). Someone said that a pound of mud on your boots was equal to five pounds on your back, but why someone would be carrying five pounds of mud on their back escapes me. While three cars were parked at the TH, we saw no other hikers today. All photos taken by Phil for reasons explained on our 12/18 post of Skunk Tank.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation None
Nothing on trail but Seven Springs road just below TH had very pretty cottonwoods.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation None
none, but the grasses were pretty
_____________________
Feb 25 2020
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Little Saddle Mountain Trail #244Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 25 2020
muskybankr
Hiking8.40 Miles 1,900 AEG
Hiking8.40 Miles   2 Hrs   42 Mns   3.27 mph
1,900 ft AEG      8 Mns Break12 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Cross F to Mormon Grove, Passage 22, AZ Trail

The trail today was one for Tibber; muddy, slippery, rocky, eroded. The portions that slithered along what I’m calling the West Fork of Sycamore Creek under the junipers and sycamores and alongside some cool rock formations, otherwise known as the Little Saddle Mountain Trail, were pleasant, nonetheless.
There are several little problems with attempting to day hike sections of the AZ Trail. We fell so far in love with Passage 22, which officially measures 18.1 miles, that we hiked exactly twice its length, 36.2 miles, by converting a couple of the intermediate TH’s into out and back excursions as we were down to just one car and had to go hiking. We’ve become pretty familiar with the Cross F and Mormon Grove trailheads and have even taken a liking to Bushnell Tanks and Mt. Peeley. Thanks to Ranger Doug and his gang for clearing out the deadfalls south of Mormon Grove. We saw the slippy sliddy tracks of a couple hikers that must have tried this in the last two days but no other hikers today. There were some ATV’rs that accessed the service road(393) but no dirt bike tracks. Also no flowers except some filaree on the extreme southern tip of the trail.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
filaree on the southern tip
_____________________
1 archive
Feb 18 2020
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
AZ Trail passage 22B, AZ 
AZ Trail passage 22B, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Feb 18 2020
muskybankr
Hiking9.50 Miles 2,337 AEG
Hiking9.50 Miles   5 Hrs   10 Mns   2.04 mph
2,337 ft AEG      30 Mns Break12 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
We parked vehicles at both TH’s and swapped keys at the junction of the Thicket Springs/Cornucopia loop. I will note that the signage at this junction moves the AZ Trail over to the longer Cornucopia trail(see photo) while the official GPS route takes the shorter Thicket Springs Loop trail up to Cornucopia, a difference of 0.9 miles on my GPS although the official route had about 50 more feet of AEG in this section. We met a through hiker with the delightful trail name of “Miles Kilo” on this longer section. He had hiked up from Mexico in the last month and was just about to the half-way point. This is the second through hiker we’ve met in our desultory attack on the AZ Trail in the last two months.
The routes into the trailheads will keep your attention. While the Mormon Grove road crossed Sycamore Creek two or three times, at least there was no snow and ice on it and the foundation of both roads were very firm, no erosion (unlike the road to Roger’s Trough which has some severe erosion.) Probably passable with a two wheel drive car(at least to Mormon Grove, maybe not so much on the Mt. Peeley road which had a half dozen sections of snow and ice. (see photos)

The trail itself had a half-mile or so of 3” deep mud and water on the southern portion with no real way to avoid it, along with the usual complement of deadfall trees of impressive magnitude closer to the West Fork of the Sycamore Creek attempting to block the trail. We went under, over, and around them. There were also more rolling rocks in this section although not in the class of the trail up to Black Mesa in Spur Cross, which consists of nothing but grapefruit sized rolling rocks. McFarland Canyon, with its tall trees inviting campers, and two mine shafts inviting four–legged squatters, is a favorite camping spot but you may need to put up with the neighbors at night which Kilo told us were big and noisy.

We actually saw a few flowers above 5500 feet but they were all huddled together and we saw no others on the lower climes. Trail angels were active in this passage as we saw several jugs of water. The maintenance crew had recently passed through this section with one of their wheeled trail machines.(Thanks to info from Ranger Doug we now believe those tracks we're made by a dirt bike) One of our guys surmised that the machine’s on board computer had a new cairn app which sorted rocks to fit the algorithmic cad/cam cairn designs, as we saw several spiffy cairns. This is what happens when you’ve been out in the sun too long and you’re hiking with an old guy who’s so slow your mind starts wandering off.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation None
Isolated
_____________________
3 archives
Jan 27 2020
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
AZ Trail-22A1-Saddle Mountain, AZ 
AZ Trail-22A1-Saddle Mountain, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jan 27 2020
muskybankr
Hiking10.59 Miles 1,005 AEG
Hiking10.59 Miles   4 Hrs   18 Mns   2.74 mph
1,005 ft AEG      26 Mns Break12 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
Most of the passages on the Arizona Trail have been split into roughly 10 mile sections so they can be day hiked. But we’re finding our biggest challenge is getting our cars to the trail heads, many of which require high clearance, 4WD vehicles, of which our crew has one and a half although the Subaru does pretty well. Waiting for our Subaru hiker to return from Ecuador where he’s climbing a bunch of their snow peak volcanoes, we decided to drive a 2WD up to Bushnell Tanks and hike up and back to the Cross F TH, about half way to Mormon Grove, the end of 22A. Like much of the AZ Trail, this is a mixture of 1 and 2 track trails. Although the official GPS route measures only 4.4 miles from Sunflower(SR 87) to the intersection leading to Cross F, my GPS had us at 5.5 miles, in part because the AZ Trail is .8 miles from the recommended Bushnell Tanks parking lot and my trip computer records readings every 5 seconds and the official GPS was taking shots every 13.6 seconds. We saw plenty of cow tracks but no cows or other hikers. Stopping for a snack at the 393 service road intersection, a caravan of jeeps came by followed by a young lady walking a couple of dogs on her regular loop route and said we were the only hikers she’s ever seen on that trail. There are many springs alongside this trail and even some farm ponds. Coming back, we decided to bushwhack a shortcut to SR87, and while it saved us .26 miles, it’s not overly worthwhile as the little access route from the Bushnell Tanks parking lot area to the AZ Trail crosses Sycamore Creek a couple of times and is very pleasant.
Culture
Culture
Shoe Tree
_____________________
Jan 13 2020
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
AZ Trail Superstion Wilderness 19C, AZ 
AZ Trail Superstion Wilderness 19C, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jan 13 2020
muskybankr
Hiking6.60 Miles 522 AEG
Hiking6.60 Miles   2 Hrs   55 Mns   2.68 mph
522 ft AEG      27 Mns Break12 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
After getting through Passage 18 on the Arizona Trail(Picketpost to Roger’s Trough), Passage 19, the Superstition Wilderness, looked like an even tougher challenge, particularly 19A and B, Roger’s Trough to Two Bar Ridge, so we thought we’d do 19C instead, which can be finessed by going from Cottonwood TH to Cemetery TH, which is what some of us did; the others came back after lunch(a very pleasant one at the Marina) and hiked the final leg from Roosevelt Bridge back to Cemetery. In this way, if FR83 into Cottonwood was passable we could use it with Campaign to finish off 19A and B, since Roger’s Trough, while the road in is not a great pleasure, is at least passable with Brian’s jeep. FR83 into Cottonwood TH, when dry, can probably be done with the family 4WD sedan, according to Phil, who has one. The condition of the road into Campaign TH remains a mystery for the moment, and with it our possible attack on 19 A and B.

We utilized our normal routine of misdirection and aimless wandering but finally discovered that the intersection of FR83 and Trail #120 at Cottonwood TH was obscured since the sign had fallen down. Our three musketeers fixed that(see photo) and the hike, while chilly(see photo) was short and pleasant enough. Kudos to the crew that moved this trail out of Cottonwood Creek and marked all the crossings with well built cairns(see photo). We saw no other hikers on 19C that wanted to pass the time of day with us. (The one we did see veered totally off the trail into the underbrush??) Likewise, lots of deer sign but no deer. FR341, which the AZ Trail uses to negotiate the final three miles or so of 19C to Cemetery TH, was recently bull dozed and seemed passable with the family sedan, not that there would be any point in doing so.

One final point of confusion. My Az topo map for my Garmin shows FR83 stopping about ½ mile from the actual Cottonwood TH. In fact, they actually intersect, although while not shown on the map, FR83 seems to have been rebuilt around a small rock slide that blocked the old road which may explain this confusion.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation None
One small macarantha hiding under a rock.
_____________________
Jan 10 2020
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
AZ Trail 18B-Reavis Canyon, AZ 
AZ Trail 18B-Reavis Canyon, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jan 10 2020
muskybankr
Hiking11.50 Miles 3,199 AEG
Hiking11.50 Miles   6 Hrs      2.23 mph
3,199 ft AEG      50 Mns Break12 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Starting off in early morning ‘ere the sun comes over the mountain, under suspicious eyes of grazing cattle, strangers look at rims and ridges of Montana Mt. 2000 feet above them and take their first step toward the top, nine miles away. There is something about this that cannot be captured with words or photos; it must be experienced. The sun finally appears, lighting up the peaks across the valley, and a windmill far below us creaks into action. We spook a lonely steer hiding behind a palo verde and the mountains come alive with early morning shades and shadows. We are hiking the Arizona Trail through the Tonto National Forest toward Rogers Trough and the start of the Superstition Wilderness, moving from one wilderness to another. Today's hike completes our first Passage, #18
_____________________
2 archives
Nov 25 2019
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
AZTrail 18A-Whitford Canyon, AZ 
AZTrail 18A-Whitford Canyon, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Nov 25 2019
muskybankr
Hiking7.11 Miles 870 AEG
Hiking7.11 Miles   3 Hrs   14 Mns   2.36 mph
870 ft AEG      13 Mns Break12 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
AZ 18A-Whitford Canyon

After what seemed like months of planning, access road weather scares, and innumerable delays searching for hikers with 4WD vehicles, we finally started our assault on day hiking some parts of the AZ Trail from Passage 18 [Picketpost(mile 300) to somewhere around Passage 32 Flagstaff(mile 600)] with the most modest excursion from Picketpost to the first crossing of FR650, which on my GPS was 7.33 miles but is officially about 6.9 miles. Since my orienteering expert and his jeep can only be pried out of Alaska for short visits, this effort will take several years at our present rate of completion but perhaps they’ll haul an ounce of my ashes with them towards the end for a spiritual(?)-conquest. We owe the motivation for this project to “Snowshoe” who hiked the AZ Trail in April and previously did the Ice Age trail in WI forwards and backwards, which is where I think we met her.
We decided to do a key swap, which may be a tricky plan going forward when phones don’t work well deep in the Supes, but today it all worked well. Saw some better hikers out there, including Silver, who told us about all the water caches upstream as he was trying to make his way to that beer joint in Superior. Good luck, Silver. The trail was dry and in good shape throughout as was the access road. Some very cool rocks in Whitford Canyon of which I include one picture. We think this is a good idea whether or not we get to complete it.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
_____________________
Nov 08 2019
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Granite Mountain Trail #261Prescott, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 08 2019
muskybankr
Hiking8.25 Miles 1,721 AEG
Hiking8.25 Miles   5 Hrs   30 Mns   1.87 mph
1,721 ft AEG   1 Hour   5 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Granite Mountain, Prescott NF, #261

Saw this hill on our trip to the Memorial Juniper Tree and decided to give it a try but go to the actual summit and not just the overlook. The trail up was in really good condition so when we reached the junction we turned left to the summit(we thought) and aimlessly wandered from cairn to cairn for an hour until it was obvious that we had missed the scramble route to the top and being short of time, retraced our steps, checked in at the overlook, and came back to the bottom, having added 2 miles of wandering, lost among the cairns. Later, reading the triplogs, I have decided that that was a pretty good miss since the actual scramble trail to the top might feature some class 5 rocks, well above my paygrade. We did count five tarantulas out on the trail today, along with ten other hikers, and one small dog.

You can’t hike this mountain without the memories of the Doce fire that came through here in June, 2013 and the Yarnell Hill fire two weeks later. Some charcoaled trees still stand.

The one improvement we added to the trip coming from the Valley was to circle around much of Prescott and Prescott Valley and all those red lights by taking 89A south, accessed from Fain Rd, which leads to N. Williamson Valley Rd. and then Iron Springs to FR374 and the Metate Trailhead. This adds a few extra miles at 65 mph but takes several minutes off the route shown on the triplog. There is a $5 fee at the trailhead for which you can use your Golden Age Passport.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
Mar 29 2019
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Miners Needle LoopPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 29 2019
muskybankr
Hiking9.00 Miles 1,750 AEG
Hiking9.00 Miles   4 Hrs   49 Mns   2.28 mph
1,750 ft AEG      52 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Yet another magnificent day in the Supes and a couple of 80–year olds in our hiking group of six thought they might be able to make it around Miner’s Needle one more time. With apologies to Tennyson, “We are not now the strength which in the old days” sped around Miner’s Needle but we can still creep around it, and creep we did, interrupted at Whiskey Bottle by another Diamondback lying in the bushes, pretty hard to see them camouflaged like that. We took the opportunity, thanks to Tibber and others, to shoot 200 feet up Whiskey Bottle and get a preview of Weaver’s Needle and what I’m guessing was Bluff Springs Mountain. A couple of backpackers we bumped into there sprinted over and ran up Miner’s Summit. Impressive, but that was not on the octogenarian’s agenda today. I had intended to retighten my laces before leaving that pass and the trip down Bluff Springs reminded me that I had forgotten to do that. Black toes tomorrow. Plenty of hikers, plenty of flowers today, although not quite the diversity I was hoping for. We met some youngsters coming off Cave Trail. Very nice to see people making it down that trail on their own power and to see so many others taking advantage of one of the great treasures of our state.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation None
Plentiful, not a lot of diversity, however.
_____________________
1 archive
Mar 20 2018
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Lookout Mountain Summit Trail #150Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 20 2018
muskybankr
Hiking0.98 Miles 498 AEG
Hiking0.98 Miles   1 Hour   20 Mns   0.74 mph
498 ft AEG10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Hadn’t climbed Lookout Mountain for over 20 years but it came up on our hike organizer’s roulette wheel so I consulted Teva Joe’s website to see if they’d moved it or anything and discovered it’s apparently Tibber’s favorite hike which was good because Tibber writes nicely detailed triplogs.

I think that the high circumference trail which leads off just below the summit to make a counter-clockwise connection to the summit trail again is new; at least I didn’t remember it and it does not appear to be marked with any number. (See GPS log) It had some interesting ups and downs and I’d like to see it circumnavigate the entire mountain at that elevation. Instead, when we got back to the summit trail we shot up to the saddle again and took 308 down, around, and back to the car, which was unfortunately parked halfway down 16th street. This trail is too popular.

I have a new camera now that adjusts for the fact that I’m way too slow to get into that 10 second window so it waited for me to wander into the view finder with my hiking buddies today.
_____________________
Feb 24 2018
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Indian Spring Wash - Bartlett DamPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 24 2018
muskybankr
Hiking5.80 Miles 673 AEG
Hiking5.80 Miles   2 Hrs   41 Mns   2.49 mph
673 ft AEG      21 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Revisited the Indian Springs wash down to the bootleg slot canyon and was pleased to find it bereft of the typical deadfall which completely block the trail. The bamboo thicket down by the springs remains impenetrably abundant but fortunately, unlike the saguaro, does not seem to grow out of rocks, so it can be circumvented if you have boots with a high traction quotient. The wash itself is lined with canyon walls consisting of what I will call volcanic breccia but that is because I am not a geologist. It’s probably something else but there are all kinds of different rocks strewn along the trail so it begs for a geological docent to conduct an interpretive hike before it gets too hot. The Chuparosa were starting to bloom. I include a few photos of rocks and flowers.
Flora
Flora
Chuparosa
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
Jan 10 2018
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Granite Mountain Hotshots Memorial TrailPrescott, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 10 2018
muskybankr
Hiking7.14 Miles 1,800 AEG
Hiking7.14 Miles   3 Hrs   55 Mns   2.32 mph
1,800 ft AEG      50 Mns Break12 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Given that the parking lot at this Trailhead is normally filled before 9 am, said the Ranger, we opted for a day with forecasted rain and 33 degree temperatures. Good thinking, only one car in the lot at 8:30am. It was actually quite balmy(41 degrees) without a drop of rain although we hiked up through the clouds(see photos) which added a touch of otherworldliness to the hike. The trail up was in very good shape and only the trip down to the fatality site had a bit of muddiness. Mother Nature is working up a metaphor on this trail as new green growth from underbrush is curling up through what’s left of the fire-burnt trees scattered left and right as you ascend. With plaques every 600 feet, there are 19 plus opportunities to rest and absorb this horrific tragedy that will never be forgotten, certainly in Yarnell and Prescott.

It’s unfortunate that the plaques themselves are not outlasting the sun and they will need to be redone somehow soon to remain readable, and hopefully, with different materials.

This is an awesome experience; the trail isn’t that tough, and most hikers with proper equipment can handle it, particularly when the temperatures do not climb above 45 degrees. We had two 79 yr.olds in our group plus a couple of other old guys, and although the elapsed time was nearly four hours, that included fifty minutes of non-moving time, my GPS reported. My GPS recorded 7.67 miles and 1850 of AEG but we went down to the flagpole at the fatality site and wandered around a bit.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation None
none
_____________________
Nov 13 2015
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Ballantine Cabin & CorralPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 13 2015
muskybankr
Hiking11.50 Miles 2,600 AEG
Hiking11.50 Miles   5 Hrs   30 Mns   2.42 mph
2,600 ft AEG      45 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
The big takeaway from this hike is don’t multitask on the Ballentine Trail. While looking down at my GPS for Teva Joe’s route map to find the intersection for the Cabin route I barely touched a Teddy Bear Cholla and drove about a 4 inch ball of spines into my knee. So that took a few minutes of combing, leathermanning and bleeding. Then we were off for the Cabin, which honestly, was not worth that much blood. Even though there were some unopened cans of refried beans available and the wind, which blew my hat off about a dozen times, was making music on the tin roof, I don’t think it would have made it onto Zane Grey’s top ten line shack list. The bushwhack trek out of there over to the Corral is another challenge. I had stopped looking at the route map and consequently got a bit left of the trail, on the other side of the wash, which involved a bit more blood letting, but this time, for the four of us to get over the pass through acres of thorns and claws, then down to the corral, which has seen better days as well. It turned out that my hiking pants fell victim to one or more of the bushes and I hope REI is understanding about these sort of bushwhacking mishaps. We had done some of this in 2007, but the trail, particularly the crushed granite sections, is far more eroded and slippery than 8 years ago. But it was a beautiful day in the Mazzies; there were some Machaeranthera, or possibly asters, and yellow conglomerates out, a friendly tarantula, and a couple of laughs. What more could anyone want?
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Light
Nice purple asters and yellow conglomerates
_____________________
Nov 06 2015
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Vulture PeakSouthwest, AZ
Southwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 06 2015
muskybankr
Hiking4.20 Miles 1,340 AEG
Hiking4.20 Miles   2 Hrs   45 Mns   1.95 mph
1,340 ft AEG      36 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Vulture Peak

It’s the start of the hiking season for us and we’re overweight and out of shape so we picked something easy with a dash of AEG, Vulture Peak outside of Wickenburg. Got three youngsters (hardly over 75) to come with me. Some of us used to hike this back when we were younger and remember the slippery finale of this hike which is now an undignified 220 foot of what seems like vertical rock scramble and fortunately, at least today, not that slippery. I knew we were climbing high but I was still surprised to find three people from Switzerland up top when we got there. Didn’t realize that we’d climbed that high!
_____________________
Apr 17 2015
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Brown's PeakPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 17 2015
muskybankr
Hiking5.20 Miles 2,064 AEG
Hiking5.20 Miles   4 Hrs      2.20 mph
2,064 ft AEG   1 Hour   38 Mns Break11 LBS Pack
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
bdurrell
Ron, who’s a young 76 year old, joined Brian and me for our annual assault on Brown’s Peak this year with somewhat better results than last year–this year Brian made the left turn in the scree chute at the 7440 mark and discovered that, with a couple more turns, it took him all the way to the top. Then he was smart enough on the way back down to speed up in front of me and was hiding safely in the notch at the bottom when I sent my annual rock slide tumbling past him. A few more years and I think we’ll have all those loose rocks safely somewhere down around Canyon Lake.

I imagine someone has done a shout out to that 4th Calvary soldier who climbed this peak in 1867 and inscribed a fairly hard rock on the top with that information. Perhaps he rode a horse to the Lone Pine Trail Head but that had to be quite a climb in hobnail boots.

Hills Lupine were abundant to the 6300 foot mark and Camissonia, I think, were also plentiful to the 7000 foot mark although my flower guide says they only grow below 4500 feet, so they may have been imposters or a different variety.

We celebrated our own little victory by taking the scenic shortcut on #143 over to the 188 and it was scenic and shorter until we got to the 188, then it was an hour longer to get back to Scottsdale, even with a mocha frappe, although if you’ve never seen the tailing piles around Miami, the three hour and 15 minute trip might be worth it.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Moderate
Hills Lupine, Camissonia plentiful. Several other species, not plentiful.
_____________________
Mar 27 2015
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Rock Creek Trail #42 - MazatzalsPayson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 27 2015
muskybankr
Hiking8.00 Miles 2,903 AEG
Hiking8.00 Miles   6 Hrs      1.76 mph
2,903 ft AEG   1 Hour   28 Mns Break11 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
bdurrell
When Ted, Brian, and I finished our hike today, we went back over our decisions and tried to see what we did that was smart. This came out to three things, everything else we did failing to measure up on the smart scale with a 2/3 majority vote. Since the temperature was forecast to be 95 in Phoenix today, we decided that this would be a good day to hike the 19 mile loop in the Mazzies going up Rock Creek trail and ultimately back down Barnhardt and over to the car on Half Moon. You will not find this in the smart decision folder. It was 75 in the Mazzies today, way too warm for what they offered. The smart decisions turned out to be to wear long clothes, always a good idea that includes hiking or bushwhacking in the Mazzies. Stopping for a mocha frappe is always a good decision following a hike. Turning around at Deadman Falls and heading back was an excellent decision. Brian ran out of water at the 9.5 mile mark. Fortunately, we were almost back by then after several misadventures, all of which I shall not bore you with but 1.5 miles of which I have deleted from the GPS log as unnecessary scenic misdaventures.

But to start with, the trails are not marked, nor are the trailheads. So we decided to use Teva Joe’s GPS log that I had downloaded, ignoring his comments that he had trouble finding the trail. So did we. We parked right next to Joe’s “start point” and about 500 feet up the first draw, the trail disappeared. An hour of bushwhacking up and down a large, steep, ridge brought us to the Rock Creek trail, completely exhausted, and in no shape to hike 19 miles, certainly. One hour of bushwhacking today in the warm weather was worth about five hours of trail hiking. In any event it took us 6 hours to hike the 9.5 miles so this was like a ten hour hike-energy wise. If you’re going to hike the 19 mile loop, it’s wise to be hiking at dawn, not 8:15. The trailhead is 2.25 hours from Carefree. Rock Creek Trail, even if we had found it to start, is maybe three times as hard as hiking up Barnhardt, mostly because it’s steeper and the trail, itself, while decent, cannot compare with Barnhardt’s excellent trail. It has some fallen trees, overgrown manzanita, shrub live oak, cat claw and its cousins, despite the efforts some people must have spent on this trail about a year ago, lopping off Manzanita and sawing logs, without which it’d be much worse. I’d now be inclined to hike the loop clockwise. In February.

And now for the good things. Flowers were abundant, including the largest display of Lupine I’ve seen this year. Gambel Oaks were plentiful as were alligator juniper, though many of these are fire-damaged, which is an understatement, since often only a hollowed out trunk is left. Water was flowing in the major creeks so bringing a filter and iodine tablets would have been a good decision had we done it. Although we did not see it, a large elk had walked some of the trail before us and helped lead us through the underbrush. We found a decent sized cave (plenty big enough for a bear) while bushwhacking and wisely decided not to explore it. The falls are excellent(although not that much flowing water today) and the scenery is pretty good but neither are as good as what Barnhardt offers when the water is running, whether or not you agree with the names.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial
morning glory, lupine, mexican poppy, verbena,

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Rock Creek Falls @ 6,100 Ft Medium flow Medium flow
_____________________
Mar 03 2015
muskybankr
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 259
 Triplogs 34

82 male
 Joined Dec 11 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
Yavapai Point Trail - Lake PleasantPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 03 2015
muskybankr
Hiking5.80 Miles 807 AEG
Hiking5.80 Miles   2 Hrs      3.31 mph
807 ft AEG      15 Mns Break11 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners partners
bdurrell
The hiking club in our subdivision went out to Lake Pleasant to explore the two new trails off of Castle Hot Springs road which intersect the old Pipeline trail with the floating bridge which can be picturesque when the lupine and poppies are blooming. They weren’t today. The new trail, known as Cottonwood, starts right at the pay box and was pretty much nondescript. After 1.5 miles it connects to Yavapai Point trail which winds around some hills for 1.4 miles and ends up on top of a ridge on what is apparently Yavapai Point, just above Pipeline’s floating bridge. In the process this trail connects with the old Pipeline trail in a couple of places and you, of course, have the option to piece this trail into your hike, which would be recommended if the lupine are out. The views of Lake Pleasant are awesome so this will be a great hike with or without flowers. I would normally recommend skipping the Cottonwood trail, driving over to the old Pipeline trailhead, and starting out on Pipeline which connects very soon to the Yavapai Point trail. The YP trail is a new single track, and I do mean single track. With our 30 people we bumped into a crowd from Sun City coming back down from the top, something the trail makers did not have in mind when they built the 18” wide trail up the side of a steep slope but all made it safely past each other. The two trails out and back add up to 5.8 miles and 807 AEG, most of which is on the final ascent to the top of YP. We saw several wild burro on the way in and heard some more while hiking but didn’t see them. If you like new trails and new scenic perspective, try this trail mid-March. The lupine should be out.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
average hiking speed 2.19 mph
1, 2  Next

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

help comment issue

end of page marker