username
X
password
register help
show related photosets
DESTINATION
Weaver's Needle Crosscut
56 Photosets

2019-11-24  
2019-10-05  
2019-03-05  
2019-03-01  
2019-01-13  
2018-12-01  
2018-12-01  
2018-03-03  
2018-02-26  
2018-01-13  
2018-01-13  
2017-01-14  
2016-11-24  
2016-09-10  
2015-06-06  
2015-01-15  
2015-01-01  
2015-01-01  
2015-01-01  
2014-07-04  
1,  2,  3  
mini location map2018-01-13
6 by photographer avatarDennisWilliams
photographer avatar
 
Weaver's Needle CrosscutPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 13 2018
DennisWilliams
Hiking6.00 Miles 1,000 AEG
Hiking6.00 Miles   4 Hrs      2.00 mph
1,000 ft AEG   1 Hour    Break10 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
The last time I was up to Weavers Needle I noticed a curious standing rock along the Terrapin Trail about a half-mile further in from the Bluff Springs trail junction. It is up and to the right of the trail about 150 yards. It is very close to the parent rock face and only becomes visible from the trail as a completely free standing rock for about a 4 foot section of trail. I'm sure most people just cruise by and never notice. As you walk along you have to be looking up at precisely the right moment to see the sliver of blue sky between the rocks. I had always intended to go back and recon that rock to see if it can be climbed. Today was that day.

The hike in is very pleasant. I love the Bluff Springs Trail with all of the fantastical rock along Barks Canyon. At the saddle I scrambled up the slope and managed to get to the neck. I took a quick look around the south and north sides, going under the rock. The rock itself is dramatically overhung on the south, east, and north sides. The separation from the parent rock varies from 6 - 12 inches. It is not directly climbable, at least not by me. I looked for access via the parent rock. This rock is probably doable with rope, at least from the vantages that I had. Summing up the recon; not doable by me as a casual scramble. I'm sure some worthy out there can figure a way up by going the long way around from the west, but it will involve a great deal of bouldering and scrambling. I encourage somebody out there to go for it, although even the parts I did involved some exposed C4 stuff. Don't fall.

I made some observations of the neck and the dimensions of the rock. The neck is about 2.5 X 4 feet. The rock is about 35 feet long by 17 feet high by about 12 feet wide. Not being a perfect rectangle I estimated the volume and mass. Converting to metric I estimate 108 cubic meters of rock. The rock itself is probably a granite and the neck is probably a welded tuff, a soft stone prone to weathering, hence the neck. For the interest of the truly nerdy out there I went on line and got some beta on the density of granite and failure modulus of welded tuff. I get a rough mass of 240,000 kg, and compressive stress of about 2 MPa at the neck vs. a failure modulus of about 100 MPa for welded tuff. It is not likely to fall soon unless directly hit by a violent wind micro-burst.

A fun little recon.
_____________________
"All is as thinking makes it so."

- Marcus Aurelius
help comment issue

end of page marker