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18 triplogs

Nov 03 2018
Zort
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Rustic 7 Springs Ride from Bronco TH, AZ 
Rustic 7 Springs Ride from Bronco TH, AZ
 
Mtn Biking avatar Nov 03 2018
Zort
Mtn Biking21.13 Miles 3,355 AEG
Mtn Biking21.13 Miles   8 Hrs   10 Mns   3.00 mph
3,355 ft AEG   1 Hour   7 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Having a more positive experience than expected the previous weekend on Bronco (247), on Saturday 11/3 I decided to go back out, add some mileage and up the ante with a ride from Bronco TH, pursuing a very rustic CCW loop on: Trail 4 south from the TH :next: Cottonwood (247) south :next: Skunk Creek (246) south and west :next: Quien Sabe (250) south with a jog west through Matty's Fork then south again :next: Skull Mesa (248) west then south :next: Cottonwood (247) east/northeast :next: Bronco (245) east then northeast with a nice downhill bomb back to the Bronco TH. See the GPX.

8:56 AM - Rode from Bronco TH to Trail 4 TH. The road is in decent shape. Passenger cars will have no problem. Things are drying a bit, so it's pretty dusty again.

9:13 AM - Started on Trail 4. Riparian loveliness down along the creek. Nice photo ops.

9:25 AM - Crossing the creek was easy, though I didn't find the cairn marking the Cottonwood trail on the other side quite as easily as the previous week. It's a steep grunt up from the creek, but then the trail becomes a fun challenge of water bar step-ups and climbing. Cartwright Ranch - location, location, location!

9:35 AM - Junction of Cottonwood and Skunk Creek. Skunk Creek is generally too steep and full of baseballs and baby heads to ride many of the climbs, but the scenery is rugged, remote and totally worthy. Steep uphills lead to steep downhills, and things can become eye-popping and hilarious if you let gravity have her way with you. Keep off the front brakes and out of the deep ruts, and you could be just fine. Wow, this trail has a ton of elevation gain! Oh look, a tarantula tiptoeing down the trail.

10:22 AM - Junction with Quien Sabe. Hmm... Before long the machete came out of its sheath and extra time was spent in several places hacking cat claw and prickly pear from the wreckage that was perhaps a trail once. There appears to have been no work done and very, very little foot traffic on Quien Sabe since the Cave Creek Complex Fire in '05. Several skeletal trees crossed the trail. Some were cleared, but plenty of cat claw, prickly pear, tall grass, ruts, holes, dead-fall and general mayhem remain to entertain adventure seekers.

12:30 PM - Matty's Fork stopped me cold. What a stunning little gulch! What a welcome bit of shade! There was simply no resisting a quick explore down the creek bed on foot. Noshing and extra hydrating was done. Water was not flowing in the stream bed, but there may have been some under the sand. From Matty's, finding the remnants of Quien Sabe required patience, GPS and a huge cairn. Even then I repeatedly lost it in the high grass, or did I? Who knows? ;) Nearing the junction with Skull Mesa, there was a short section of trail utterly choked with Desert Holly (or something similar) that required more hacking to pass.

1:18 PM - Skull Mesa Trail east of the mesa is really sketchy, eroded, and a tricky thing to follow. A pair of red-tailed hawks circled and screamed above Quien Sabe Peak. As a boy growing up in the rain forest of the northwest, I dreamed of being a bald eagle. Now, in the desert southwest, the dream soars on tawny wings and super-heated updrafts. Uh-oh, all the route finding, daydreaming and playing with the machete were putting me way behind schedule. No mechanical issues with the bike though, so things were sure to get better. They didn't - at least not yet. Finding the cut where the trail drops off the shoulder of Quien Sabe Peak down to Cottonwood required wandering, backtracking, GPS and a few extra minutes. The downhill section of this trail is a nasty gutter. Being solo, I dared not attempt riding down the steep, loose-powder, jumbled garbage chute sections. Further down, off in the weeds (literally) I abused a prickly pear with my front tire and had to futz with the tire to get it to seal up. Yep, getting further behind schedule.

3:05 PM - Finally, I made it down off the mesas and into Cottonwood Creek. Yesssssss!!! Thank you, Jesus and praise to Allah! Just upstream from the trail junction was a shady spot where two arms of the drainage came together and the creek flowed strong. I dug a small depression, and the silt quickly cleared leaving a pool of clean, cool water. I treated a couple liters, and snacked on some Dukes sausages and an RX bar. And there was a great rejoicing. After that, riding in the creek and sometimes alongside it on the Maricopa Trail was much more enjoyable than the chossy and choked mess I'd been through to this point. In fact, it was downright pleasant.

4:15 PM - Junction with Bronco Trail. Climbs too steep to climb were attempted, and when that didn't work there was pushing the bike uphill. And there was *lots* of this lung-busting fun. Not to worry, the trek was nearing its end. Good thing, too - the shadows were growing taller than my, uh...metaphors. Or something.

4:42 PM - Tank in the East Fork of Bronco Creek. Really, seriously, there was just One. Climb. Left. A nice little seep partway up the trail darkened the soil and gave off that unmistakable water-on-the-desert smell of life and salvation. Then it was smooth sailing down the ridge to Bronco Trailhead.

5:10 PM - Bronco Trailhead. 21.6 miles all wrapped up in a tidy 8 hours and 10 minutes overall. Moving time was 5 hours 29 minutes, and the moving avg was just about 4 mph. That's a solid day's work, and great solo adventure.
Fauna
Fauna
Tarantula
Culture
Culture
HAZ - Hike HAZard
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated

dry Quien Sabe Spring Dry Dry
Dark soil but no flow from the spring at the trail. I did not explore up to the spring itself
_____________________
Zort
http://instagram.com/zort_the_beholder
Oct 02 2017
Zort
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Horse Trail - LCR GorgeNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 02 2017
Zort
Hiking
Hiking
15 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
After deciding I was too far behind schedule and the Little C was too wet and silty for my intended trip down from Cameron to the Confluence, last week I made a hasty retrieval of a supply cache I placed two days prior down at the bottom of Horse Trail Canyon on the LCR.

Many thanks to HikeAZ folks who shared info on this pleasantly short and relatively easy route down to what will remain my intended supply cache location for a future trip down the Little C!

Getting there:
The trailhead actually took me a very long time to find, because I was silly enough not to have saved a GPS waypoint for it, and I also had read a report here suggesting it was easy to find. To be clear, anything is easy to find with a waypoint, but without that, and no other specifics about where to enter this canyon, it is less than obvious. I posted tracks from this trip, so if you want to save a couple hours of banging around the rez, you can download them and avoid all that exploratory adventure. :)

Basically, you take US 89 to Navaja 6134, follow it west 13-14 miles, then while crossing Navajo 6133, juke left onto a small two-track road and follow it to a right turn onto another small track with a cairn. This was the *only* side road that was cairned, and the only way I found the trail head. So, many thanks to whoever placed that cairn!

The Route:
As with finding the trail head, getting started on the route required a wee bit of looking. There is a cairn visible from the parking area that leads you west and down to a flat layer above the drainage. I was tempted to contour left toward the top of the obvious drainage to the south, but that's not the cairned route. Instead, stay pretty much west until hitting the edge of of the drainage and possibly seeing another cairn on the way. It might take a bit of glassing the terrain for cairns, but they are there, and they will take you down to the gravel in the wash/creek bed. From there the route will be quite obvious for folks familiar with traveling down washes and canyons. There are a couple pouroffs that will force a go-around to one side or the other. The main obstacle is a very large pour off that is maybe a third of the way down the canyon. The trail stays creek right and traverses quite a ways until necessarily heading steeply down into the creek bed again. (This is strenuous on the hike out!) You'll cross over to creek left again half to 2/3 of the way down and then just above the river you come to the odd bridge of small logs and flat stones that presumably protects a semi technical move of stepping left around a protruding rock/wall and then down to a ledge. Below that you end up crossing to creek right again, traversing above the river for a bit and then finally making the last drop through a steep layer to the river.

My moving time on this round-trip hike was about 2h 10m, but that was double-timing it down the canyon with a mostly empty pack with no time spent for photos or much drinking in of the steep, jagged beauty of the place. Unless you have a train to catch, I would recommend spending four hours or so, depending on fitness, pack, etc. It's a strenuous climb out.

Observations:
As others have said, this is the easiest route I have taken to reach the LCR from atop the impressive gorge. It is hard to picture horses going down it, but it is child's play compared to Blue Spring Trail, and both easier and shorter than Hopi Salt Trail. My plan is to use it as access for caching, but others have used it to connect with Salt Trail as a loop hike, and that would be quite pleasant, too. Really love the idea of using mountain bikes to shuttle between trail heads!

Be sure to pack enough water for the return/continued trip. Any water found in this part of LCR is sure to be nothing but chocolate silt.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation None
Dry, dry, desolate - scrubby and no flowers.
_____________________
Zort
http://instagram.com/zort_the_beholder
Mar 21 2017
Zort
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Blue Springs - LCR GorgeNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 21 2017
Zort
Hiking
Hiking
10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
The original plan was to bikepack from GCNP to the Blue Spring TH, through-hike all the way back to Lipan Point, and then retrieve the bike via a half-marathon run, buuuuuuut the Little Colorado was decidedly *NOT* open for hiking. All those awesome photos of Grand Falls running like Willy Wonka's chocolate river reveal just how much water and grit have been running down the LCR for the past weeks and months. It was flooding wall to vertical wall. Sadly, a packraft and the requisite skill to pilot one are not in my possession (yet!) so the trip was much abbreviated into an out-and-back to Blue Spring, as follows.

Sunday, Mar 12 - The drive from Phoenix to Cameron was uneventful, and using I40 East to the Country Club exit really helped to bypass any congestion in/around downtown Flagstaff. Permits are required for trekking and camping on the Navajo Nation (for non-Navajo). The previous week I spoke with Vickie at the visitor center, and we arranged to have the permit waiting for me at the Conoco station across highway, because the visitor center is closed on the weekends. I picked up the permit and jumped onto highway 64, canyon bound! It was a quick shot up to Desert Tower, where there was still some snow plowed into a bank in parking lot. That snow pile made for a handy place to lean the bike once I had it muscled out of the truck. It was nice not to have to lay it down, because a fat bike loaded with camping gear and three gallons of water is neither svelte nor dainty. Add sunscreen, turn on a device or two, don helmet and gloves, and then hit the road for multi-sport adventure!

From Desert Tower you can legally ride the service road past the employee housing and sewage treatment area and drop down the steep dirt track to the Lower Basin and the foot of Cedar Mountain. It's nearly a 1000' descent, and it really heats up the brakes when you're holding back nearly 300 lb of bike and gear and rider and water! It is prohibited to drive or even ride the trail to Cape Solitude, but you can go around Cedar Mountain and then drop down to Navajo Route 6140 due east of the mountain. Then you just continue on 6140 as I think other trip reports here describe to reach the Blue Spring TH.

That afternoon found me at the trailhead way too early, so I scouted the route a bit, took a nap in the shade of the bike, had an early dinner, said goodnight to the coyotes, owls and ravens and then turned in early. The moon was nearly full, so it was up high and bright, but it didn't keep me from getting a lot of great sleep. Hooray biorhythm correction!

Monday, Mar 13 - An early start got me... Oh, right - this is all first person "me" and singular "I" stuff, because this was a solo trip. Wouldn't recommend it, actually, because the "hiking" is pretty extreme, strenuous and exposed, as other trip reports warn. Anyway, the day started fairly early, but the route demands a lot of focus and deliberate movement. Unless someone decides that the GPX tracks I uploaded are too inaccurate or removes them for other reasons, you can get an idea of where the route starts at the big juniper tree and ends near Blue Spring itself. Everything in between is steep, occasionally exposed and generally a bit unnerving. Two main rock layers are especially challenging and involve Class 4 (at least!) moves with some very real exposure. I did not remove my day pack (about 10 lb), but a full 50L pack would have been very awkward and some lowering would have been prudent. Others have reported using belay/protection in a few places, but I just committed and made the moves unprotected.

It was upwards to a couple hours of careful travel each way, to complete the ONB. The upward scrambling required a bit more energy, but seemed less harrowing, as always seems to be the case. The route is fairly well marked by cairns, but there were a few places I got off track. As any experienced trekker will relate, when in doubt STOP and look around. Look across ravines for the exit. Retrace your steps when needed. Sometimes you need to go higher in order to see the cairns/route, but this route is so steep that it can be below. A time or two I got that exhilarating "lost" feeling and realized just how long it would take to scout a route to the top without aid of cairns left by folks who had come before. On this route more than any other, the cairns weren't an intrusion on the experience - they were a welcome part of it!

The return ride was a fairly matter-of-fact and thoroughly enjoyable retracing of my big fat tire tracks. There were some horses and cattle in the area, and they all looked healthy and happy. Quite a life they have out there with not much more than the occasional fly or cyclist to distract them from their grazing, cloudbusting and whatever else they do with their time. :)

To summarize; the route is excellent - if you're up to it. For reference, it was harder than the Pt. Huitzil Rt, with the exception of the big slab on Huitzil. Using a fat bike to pack and camp was lots of fun, but you better be ready to do some real work if you want to go that route. To take a full pack down Blue Spring Tr would be hard, and a few spots would require lowering big packs, IMO. Having said that, the original itinerary is still very much on my to-do list, as is the full-monty trek from Cameron to the Confluence. The LCR gorge offers many amazing, remote, rugged, challenging and often solitary experiences. Perfect!

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Blue Spring Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Yeah, Blue Spring was gushing *somewhere* down there in all that chocolate syrup flooding in from all over the high country.
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Zort
http://instagram.com/zort_the_beholder
Mar 02 2017
Zort
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Mesquite Canyon - Waddell - Ford Canyon LoopPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 02 2017
Zort
Hiking10.60 Miles 1,921 AEG
Hiking10.60 Miles
1,921 ft AEG25 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Beautiful day hike with my bro in town from Anchorage. Lots of water (at least for these normally sere and arid lands) in the creeks up Ford Canyon, at Willow Spring (water trickling down the falls), and elsewhere. But the real stars of the show were the wildflowers popping like crazy, especially toward the bottom of Mesquite Canyon. Poppies, lupines, buckhorn cholla and other plants and flowers are all *very* happy with all our rain this winter. Get out there and see the sights, kids!
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Willow Spring - White Tanks Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Huge pool below the pour off running at over 1 gpm at Willow Spring
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Zort
http://instagram.com/zort_the_beholder
Feb 11 2017
Zort
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Huge Palm Desert Point to Point thru Palm Cnyn, CA 
Huge Palm Desert Point to Point thru Palm Cnyn, CA
 
Mtn Biking avatar Feb 11 2017
Zort
Mtn Biking25.97 Miles 2,439 AEG
Mtn Biking25.97 Miles   6 Hrs   10 Mns   5.92 mph
2,439 ft AEG   1 Hour   47 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
As all are probably aware, California received lots of rain and snow this winter. The southern desert is alive with greenery and water running in normally dry washes and creek beds. It is beautiful out there!

A group of friends did a point-to-point mountain bike ride from Pinyon Flat CG in the mountains south of Palm Desert on Pinyon Trail along Omstott Creek, down Palm Canyon past several springs, Mesquite Flat, and Indian Potrero. We turned east and rode up Rock Canyon on the “dry wash climb” to Dunn Road, then north to the top of the Art Smith Trail. The ride finished by "descending" Art Smith all the way down to the TH at Highway 74, passing Bighorn Sheep and native Palm Oases along the way.

This is a full meal deal on a bike, *very* strenuous and occasionally quite steep in places. Read: not for beginners. The route would be far too long for all but the hardest of hikers to complete in a day, but it would be fantastic as an overnighter! Wildflowers were limited last week but things should be starting to pop soon.

NDA alert! NO DOGS ALLOWED on much, if not all of this route. :(
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Dutch Charlie Canyon Medium flow Medium flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Omstott Creek Medium flow Medium flow
It's apparently quite rare to see Omstott in flow, but it was and may remain for some time
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Zort
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Jan 01 2017
Zort
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Reavis Ranch via 109 SouthGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 01 2017
Zort
Hiking14.40 Miles 2,455 AEG
Hiking14.40 Miles
2,455 ft AEG23 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
They said it wouldn't rain so much on New Year's Day. They were wrong.

The drive from north Phoenix was highlighted by several different kinds of rain, everything from lazy, drizzly "Seattle sucks!" kind of stuff to "Erma Gerd, the wipers can't go fast enough and we're hydroplaning down the 101!" torrential, bucketing nonsense. We should have turned around right then, backtracked 12 minutes, and have been done with it. Alas, we were not that smart.

Getting to Queen Valley road was no big thing, and even Hewitt Station Road wasn't bad until we got to the Queen Creek crossing. The creek was flowing high, and it was too silty to see the bottom. Fortunately, as timing had it, we got mixed in with a Jeep/Toyota jamboree and benefited from watching others go first. I would highly recommend NOT crossing the creek under such conditions without high clearance, 4WD, and a guinea pig to show you all the hidden holes and rocks to avoid! :scared:

Other than being over the axles in water in Queen Creek, the drive was reasonable, though very mucky in places. I wished I had my Tacoma with off-road tires instead of Deb's 4Runner with street treads, because there were a few steep, muddy spots where stopping was not really an option and steering was merely a suggestion. Cue Paul Simon and a few bars of "Slip sliding away.." I know folks do this drive in passenger cars, but please don't try it after serious rains. Just don't.

The final push up to Rogers Trough TH was quite rough, slick in places, and very steep in others. Again, 4WD territory. Finally parked at the trailhead, we snacked in the truck and waited for the rain to let up, which it soon did. Sneaky, shifty, and perfidious that was!

The weather lured us out of our perfectly good truck and into the wilderness, and then sprang the rain on us again. The hike down the Trough became an exercise in looking for the shallowest places to cross the very lively waterway. To no avail, even the Gore-Tex boots were useless, as we were nearly up to our knees in places. Fortunately, the water was cold enough to bring on a pleasant numbness before too long. :lol:

At the junction where Reavis/109 splits off from the Trough we had a brief pow-wow. We discussed turning around, because, well, it had started raining more rather than the less we were sure we remembered the weather gurus predicting for this late in the afternoon. But we are a positive, hopeful lot, and we had faith that the skies would soon clear, that we would be enjoying dryness and hot food and warm sleeping bags by nightfall. In other words, we again weren't all that smart.

...Crossing the creek, once, twice, three times(?)...approaching the Reavis grave site, wet feet, say my hat is soaked now and where are my gloves!? The trail switches back, climbs, disappears into a very thick fog. Is fog when clouds touch the ground, I asked. I mean, literally, is that the definition? We agreed that's probably right. A quick check of the time and the GPS, and we saw that the top of the climb was near. Damn good thing too, because that wind was really driving the rain up the canyon, and it wasn't getting any warmer.

Just atop the Reavis Saddle, we decided we'd had enough. Bad planning and bad weather had us cold, soaking, shivering, and in a genuinely iffy mood. And ahhhhh, the pleasure of setting up camp in a cold wind and driving rain! It's just magical. Needless to say, the weather didn't improve, we didn't have our nice hot dinner, and with the temps now in the low to mid 30s we had to don all our layers to get warm enough for sleeping.

Wind in the junipers, rain on the manzanita, something colder and harder than rain (but not quite hail) thrumming on the tent for a while, harder wind, harder rain, and then finally, after about 12 hours of being hunkered down, the weather relented. We had enough time to cook, opting for ramen and Just Veggies for brekkie - instead of the de rigueur instant oatmeal. And danged if that wasn't some of the best ramen we ever had! Then, quick as we could we packed away all our wet gear into our wet packs, put on wet boots and hit the return trail with purpose and motivation.

Despite nearly constant rain overnight, all the little creeks, seeps, rills and rivulets were running just a bit less on our hike out than on the way in the previous afternoon. Even the main drainage down Rogers Trough, while still plowing down in impressive waterfalls here and there, was reduced. My boots only filled with water once, at the deepest crossing that had been knee-deep in foam and churning silt the day before. We were back at the truck in just about two hours, though it felt like even less time.

As with the hike out, the drive out was not as wet as the day before, though the roads were actually a bit messier and rougher after so many days of rain. The amazing amount of 4x4, quad and Rhyno traffic surely didn't help the roads any. Queen Creek was clearer but just a high, but we got across without difficulty.

Just some of the things we did wrong...
- Not getting good weather info = First mistake
- Going out in questionable weather without planning for the worst possibilities = biggest mistake
- Spending too long trying to keep dry crossing the creeks when it was futile
- Not bringing camp shoes = coldest feet annoying midnight pee mistake

There were quite a few things we did right, actually. Most importantly, when things were starting to get genuinely ugly we quickly set up camp and got as warm and dry as we could. Weather like we had can be really dangerous, especially at 5000' and above, and though our hands and feet got damn cold from exposure, our cores stayed pretty warm once we got out of the elements. No one had much fun, but no one got hurt either.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Bear Spring Number One Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Water, water, everywhere!

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Reavis Saddle Spring Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Water, water, everywhere!

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Rogers Spring Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Water, water, everywhere!
_____________________
Zort
http://instagram.com/zort_the_beholder
May 08 2016
Zort
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Buckskin/Paria multisport adventure, UT 
Buckskin/Paria multisport adventure, UT
 
Hiking avatar May 08 2016
Zort
Hiking39.59 Miles 5,810 AEG
Hiking39.59 Miles   7 Hrs   58 Mns   4.97 mph
5,810 ft AEG40 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Saturday, May 7 - My girlfriend and I drove from Phoenix to the Paria Contact Station and White House Campground. It was a drop dead gorgeous day for a drive through the Arizona desert. Deep colors, clean air, white clouds on true blue skies, wide open vistas, very high wow factor.

At the Contact station the staff thought it would be a horrible idea to ride up Long Canyon on mountain bikes, as we had planned to do as a scenic alternative to using Betty or some other method of shuttling back to the truck at the end of the trek. It seemed prudent then to preview the route by driving it, and so that's just what we did. The Jeep road up Long Canyon was in fine shape, not wallowing with sand or snotty with muck, and it actually seemed a semi-reasonable thing to consider riding up it, though we knew we'd be walking certain sections - the steep ones. Atop the plateau, views from just north of Dry Lake Flat were stunning. The Cockscomb was immediately gnarly and impressive, the Buckskin Mountains were beautiful, and in the distance beyond, another set of Vermilion Cliffs to the northwest were nearly as photogenic as the Vermilion Cliffs you see along 89A.

NOTE: Four-wheel drive *was* required when cutting through The Cockscomb down to House Rock Valley Rd some several hundred feet below. The beloved 4-Low range was very especially reassuring for driver and passenger alike!

Camping at White House is a beautiful, populace, barking dog, family time, pit toilet-having experience. We did it and were glad of the convenience and gladder still to leave the busyness of it behind the next morning.

Sunday, May 8 - We parked at Wire Pass, geared up and hit the trail around 9 a.m. in cool temps, a light breeze, warm sun. A semi-retired hiker from Eugene, who winters in Tucson, hiked with us to the intersection with Buckskin Gulch. We talked about climate change, overpopulation and how screwed the Polar Bears will be when all the ice is gone. Tom studies climate change scientifically and collaboratively using satellite imagery of various kinds. Quite interesting stuff, if a bit depressing at what it reveals.

When Wire Pass narrows it becomes the perfect introduction for anyone who has not had the pleasure of going through Buckskin Gulch. Warm light, sandstone, magic. The 8' downclimb was easy, thanks in some part to cheater rocks at the base of the drop. I made the moves wearing my full pack, but we passed the others' packs here. At the junction with Buckskin, our friend-for-an-hour went up the Gulch and we went down, marveling at how awful, ugly and mundane the views were. ;P

Miles of amazement, sandy trekking, naked geology and the story of time told in the sandstone and detritus trapped in its lifeless but beautiful labyrinth. About 4-1/2 miles beyond Wire Pass we came to the spot where, many years before, my sister and brother-in-law had clambered out on the creek-left side and made an early camp. This was well before the Middle Route exit, and it now looked too vertical to even contemplate. And there were bees. Could be it wasn't the spot I recalled from nearly two decades previous, but it sure looked right. Regardless, we went on, down one narrow corridor after another, toward certain dead-ends that suddenly opened left or right, a boulder pile, a wedged log 50' overhead, a deep shadow, a warmly lit wall of sculpted stone, and so on - for hours and miles. When finally we hit some pools, we were happy to find few of them above our knees, and the water cold but not painful or numbing. The water actually felt good on our sore and tiring feet. These slippery pools are one of the few places where I truly appreciate trekking poles. Being able to feel around for the high spots and to avoid sliding into the much deeper corners is a very good thing.

At the Middle Route Exit we lunched, photographed the various petroglyphs, and I scouted the Middle Route exit. Moki steps were treacherous with sand that had to be brushed and blown out. Our original plan was to camp here and to day hike to Cobra Arch, but the exposed class 4 moves required at the Exit and the later-than-hoped hour convinced us to move on and camp instead above the confluence a few miles down canyon. Perfectly gorgeous camp spots abound in the very obvious spot creek-left just before the confluence. Couldn't be any nicer.

Monday, May 9 - Croaking frog serenade didn't keep us from getting some d*mn good sleep, and we woke sore but ready to get back on the trail. Hot breakfast and breaking camp took an hour or so, but the temps were again very nice, and after a photo op at the massively looming canyon walls we turned the corner and voila - we were in the Paria River! It was running somewhere around 10 cf/s, and it was warmer than the cesspools of Buckskin Gulch. A few miles of walking upriver, and the canyon slowly begins to open up, letting in the sun. Before long I was plowing through the river, deliberately splashing water all over my pant legs to keep things in the nice and cool range. As we started to near White House CG we were watching to see if we could spot the trail up to Calf Spring, but we missed it somehow. Shouldn't we have seen power lines overhead? Nope - missed those too. Plans for another adventure, another time are brewing and involve fat bikes and fun on the plateau above.

It was about 2:30 p.m. when we hit the campground, and we enjoyed the shade of Junipers, the warmth of soft sand on our bare feet and fine dining from tuna pouches and Triscuits. Pro tip: The Ancient Grains crackers sold by Costco are as close to the ideal cracker as we've found, and they fit very nicely in an old Pringles can. We made due with the problematically small and square crackers and dropped some lousy, fizzing electrolyte wafer things (ZipFizz?) into a Nalgene of water and immediately wished we'd packed more Skratch instead of that artificially sweetened stuff we had.

Now, here's where things got interesting.

My master plan was to retrieve mountain bikes that we had stashed in a super secret location, and then to ride those old beaters up Long Canyon and to glorious camping on the plateau. Turns out that it was really windy this day, and also turns out that riding a bike *not* set up with racks, bags or any other way to take the load of your back really, really sucks! It became immediately clear that plan B or C or G (there were so many we discussed) needed to be put into action. Ultimately, this meant that I left my girlfriend and most of my pack's contents at the ramada at the contact station, and I went on a nasty solo ride to retrieve the truck from Wire Pass. Now, a wise person pointed out once that either you can hate the wind, or you can embrace it and accept or even appreciate it as your valuable "training partner". On this day, I was not in the mood for training - this was game time! And yet, here was my training partner doing warm-up sprints, apparently long overdue for a workout, like a dog that hasn't been walked in a long, long time. To say there were gusts well over 25 mph is no exaggeration. To say that I had to pedal that old RockHopper *hard* to go downhill on US 89 is not hyperbole. If I cursed my over-exuberant partner at the top of my lungs but couldn't hear my own voice over the gale force winds, did it ever really happen? Unsure, I bellowed profanities again and then a third time - just for good measure. And then I had to save my energy, because the highway was starting to climb up and around a corner as it cut through the rocky spine that is the Cockscomb. The great thing about the wind is that when you are nearing the top of a saddle or pass it really gets motivated to put on a show. We're talking cruel, over the top antics that can scar your psyche for a very long time. It's really bad sportsmanship is what it is. The spokes were whistling, the skin on my face was stretched into an inappropriate grin, and before the very top I could swear I heard Satan chuckling somewhere in the screaming of that wind. I'll not soon forget it.

Somehow, I made it to House Rock Rd without walking. Or crying. But then when the little downhill run from the highway to the dirt road flattened out and slowly, inexorably began to climb, I nearly called it a day. The thought of sitting in the culvert under the highway, eating all the rest of my food and then just laying down to die seemed like a pretty reasonable thing to do. Fortunately, the wind was there to keep me company - trusty partner that it was! And so we battled back and forth for mile after mile of blowing dust, dirt road, the occasional carload of trekkers effortlessly gliding by swilling beers, pointing and laughing at the stupidity of my life choices. But there was an occasional downhill section, when the pedaling was slightly less hard and the speed slightly less pitifully slow. And then it happened. To my amazement, into view came another person *not* in a car, *not* gliding along effortlessly while swilling Miller Light and singing Bohemian Rhapsody at full Galileo volume. This cat was pedaling! Another fool. Another blithering idiot out in the open (hyperactive) air, moving by muscle and willpower alone! I smiled a gritty, chapped smiled, waved, and bobbled but didn't quite crash as I passed him on the blissful downhill section just before reaching Wire Pass, the truck, and the effortless gliding it represented. Seeing that bold soul, fat bike all packed down, beard out to *there*, just spinning and grinning up the hill I was going down really made my day. I wasn't bitter that he had a 25 mph tailwind. I didn't care that he was off doing exactly what I had hoped to be doing up Long Canyon. And it bothered me not at all that his facial hair was epic and worthy of song. No, I was just glowing inside knowing that we shared a secret about what it means to take your own path, to take the hard road, to be epic.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
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Apr 08 2016
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Seeking Cheyava Falls, AZ 
Seeking Cheyava Falls, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Apr 08 2016
Zort
Backpack44.50 Miles 16,272 AEG
Backpack44.50 Miles3 Days   2 Hrs   58 Mns   
16,272 ft AEG30 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Nearly 20 years to the day from my first Grand Canyon backpacking adventure, I led an aggressive trip that took three of us about three days and three hours in a quest to see Cheyava Falls. Planning for the possibility of just the perfect conditions to see the falls running, the permit request was placed and El Nino prayers were said. Sadly, Arizona got anything but the wet conditions that might lead to Cheyava flowing this past winter, but with permit secured and PTO lined up, we went to see Clear Creek anyway.

Day 1: There were clouds. There were cool temps and winds that made hiking across the often mercilessly exposed Clear Creek Trail quite pleasant. There was rain, and there were garbage bags fashioned into pack covers that flapped in the wind and gave us some concern but did the job. There was a long day and tired feet, but we were well-rewarded for our efforts.

Clear Creek is beautiful. What's more serene than the solitude of the desert? Water coursing over sand and stone, supporting the rare oases of life known as riparian areas. This is stunning. This is worth hiking over 16 miles in a day to see and hear and smell and feel.

Day 2: The whole point of the trek was to venture up Clear Creek to check out Cheyava Falls, and we spent the second day of our adventure traveling up the creek, seeing artifacts of ancient peoples and confirming that the white swath coming down the rock wall is where Cheyava Falls would be falling if a heavy late snow would have been quickly melted by warm temps and we happened to time things just right. At least we learned where to find the site of the tallest falls in Arizona.

Returning to camp at Clear Creek CG, a side trip up Obi Canyon delighted us with a short easy jaunt to the pour off waterfall at the back of the drainage. We missed the ruins, but now have a better idea of where to see them (plural, as I now understand it!). Chert scrapers and tools found along the creek trail reminded us of those who came before and eked out an existence in that beautiful but hard place.

Day 3: Simply put, we cranked out the miles retracing our steps across Clear Creek Trail, again with the help of clouds, wind and the occasional rain. At Phantom Ranch we had beers and lemmy, threw out the M&Ms we bought on the way in that were half eaten by the sly mice at Clear Creek CG, and bought new M&Ms.

From the ranch we made the familiar crossing of the Silver Bridge, and enjoyed unusually firm soil on the River trail. Even Bright Angel Tr was crusted over with a damp layer that kept our feet relatively clean. We made Indian Garden CG just as the sky opened up and really let us have it for the first time on the entire trip. We wiled away an hour or so under a ramada, eating chocolate, running a line to hang our packs out of the rain and marveling at the 4G signal that my Verizon phone was getting. No Plateau Point that rainy night.

Day 4: Just over two hours on the trail this day. Bright Angel, the Devil's Corkscrew, bright colors of new shoes and clean clothing, loud children, families, foreign tongues, the sounds and smells of cars and buses. A growler of Railhead Red was still plenty cold in the cooler when we got back to the car, and the showers at Mather were every bit as hot and good as we hoped. Burgers at Lumberyard in Flagstaff, a fill-up, a Coke for the road (sorry, it's a habit), and we were gliding back down the highway to Phoenix. Another Grand adventure in the bag!

Sorry, have yet to finish downloading pics. Stay tuned! Also seemed to be challenged as to attaching the handful of routes uploaded from this trip. Workin' on it...
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3 archives
Mar 11 2016
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Boulder Canyon Loop from First Water THPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 11 2016
Zort
Hiking11.30 Miles 1,560 AEG
Hiking11.30 Miles
1,560 ft AEG30 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Deb and I decided our monthly overnighter should be out in the Sups, and some perusing of trusty HikeArizona.com netted a great suggestion to hit up Boulder Creek. We did the hike as a CW loop from First Water TH, camping a bit past halfway through the loop. See gpx tracks. The desert was beautiful, the temps were great, Boulder Creek and other drainages had plenty of water to filter/treat, and it was an altogether awesome little 24-hour trek. Thanks, HikeArizona.com, thanks Joe, and thank the Creator for times like these!
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial
Everything is starting to pop out there
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Dec 31 2015
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 Guides 1
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 Photos 94
 Triplogs 18

51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Skull Mesa - Cottonwood Creek LoopPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 31 2015
Zort
Hiking15.69 Miles 3,843 AEG
Hiking15.69 Miles   4 Hrs   34 Mns   3.44 mph
3,843 ft AEG30 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Deb and I wanted to continue our tradition of doing an overnighter for NYE, and we needed to stay close to home. We settled on Skull Mesa for some stars and city lights and, given time, some petroglyphs or ruins. As it happened we didn't do much sightseeing, but the trip was good fun with a rugged backcountry feel.

Cave Creek was pretty much dry, and the hike to the Skull Mesa TH was easy going. We took Trail 247 to Trail 248 for Skull Mesa, topped out on the mesa, and set up camp a couple tenths of a mile along the trail where junipers and a small ridge provided some warm west-facing rocks and a sheltered, leeward space just big enough for our little Copper Spur tent.

Views down onto the massive Phoenix metropolis were spectacular, and at midnight lots of small flashes of color indicated the New Year was being ushered in down there. We'll see if any of the long-exposure photos are worth sharing. After the distant spectacle subsided and the bourbon was gone we got back in bed for the night.

The chilly, breezy night. Our lightweight setup is best for Spring/Fall, and with temps below freezing up there we resorted to sleeping in our down jackets under the down quilt. We *love* the Nemo quilt for our GCNP Spring/Fall trips, because of how packable and lightweight it is, but it wasn't quite enough for high 20's/low 30's. No worry, donning a layer of clothes did the trick, and we slept fairly well.

And we slept fairly late, finally hitting the trail at nearly 10:30 a.m. Our plan was to do the clockwise loop over the mesa and return on Cottonwood TR. Had I realized the amount and nature of the remaining trail we would have started earlier. There was a solid 9-1/2 miles of fairly demanding trail between us and the Spur Cross parking lot. And there was a certain amount of route finding to be done to find the trail between Skull Mesa and Quien Sabe. Cairns are there, they're just not overly abundant or prominent. GPS is your friend!

At right about 4000' EL, TR 248 drops down toward Cottonwood Creek and TR 247. This descent is often quite steep and loose - not so much a trail as a bowling ball gutter. Most folks would find trekking poles very helpful here. Travel gets infinitely easier back on TR 247. Am I the only one who was strongly reminded of the ridgeline descent of La Milagrosa when heading down this section of 247 toward Cottonwood Creek?

Cottonwood Trail 247 is a nice mix of creek trail and then some grunting up and down small hills as it heads back toward Cave Creek and the Spur Cross TH. It took longer than intended, but we were back well before dark, and the temps were perfect for hiking. This is a highly recommended loop hike, that as others here noted would be a very long day. A lightweight gear setup made this a really great overnight trip!

I neglected bringing a cooler with post-hike beverages and snacks, so we headed into Cave Creek and had some tasty barbecue and beers at Bryan's Black Mountain Barbecue. Cheers to 2016!
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Nov 07 2015
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 Guides 1
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51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
2015 Moab Trail Marathon, UT 
2015 Moab Trail Marathon, UT
 
Run/Jog avatar Nov 07 2015
Zort
Run/Jog26.20 Miles 3,750 AEG
Run/Jog26.20 Miles   4 Hrs   49 Mns   5.63 mph
3,750 ft AEG      10 Mns Break5 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
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Linked none no linked trail guides
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The 2015 Moab Trail Marathon was a wild romp through narrow canyons and over slickrock mesas - not so much a marathon as a giant adventure run with a 5K obstacle course thrown in at the finish just for "fun". :D I highly recommend this event for anyone who loves to run trails and isn't afraid of just a bit of hill climbing. *Train up for this one* and go click off mile after mile of unparalleled scenery on trails that vary from smooth slickrock to rocky stream beds to narrow exposed singletrack high above the Colorado River. Bring your A Game, because there -are- places where a misstep could mean real trouble.

If you love road running you might hate this. If you hate running you will still love to hike much of the trails on this route, jeep trail probably notwithstanding.

BE AWARE: A short section of the course (between miles 14 and 16) is private property, and travel was only permitted on race day.
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Oct 21 2015
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 Guides 1
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51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix Mountains Preserve - East End, AZ 
Phoenix Mountains Preserve - East End, AZ
 
Run/Jog avatar Oct 21 2015
Zort
Run/Jog6.75 Miles 699 AEG
Run/Jog6.75 Miles   1 Hour   9 Mns   5.87 mph
699 ft AEG
 
no photosets
1st trip
Colors on the radar swirled clockwise around the Valley. Dark shapes crept over Surprise and Anthem, doubtless bringing more welcome rain to those areas. There was a breeze that felt like outflow from a storm cell. But this week we finally got the cooler Fall weather we dreamed about all through September, and there was just enough sunlight left for an apres-work trail run.

Recent rains have torn and scoured the steeper, fall line sections of trails like 8A and 8B, but I don't call that erosion or destruction. That's natures way of restoring the technical aspect of the hikes, rides and runs that make the somewhat lesser traveled reaches of PMP such a pleasure.

If heat is the number one inhibitor of athletic performance, then cold air, fading light and imminent "weather" are beautifully effective countermeasures. Things got fast.
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Jan 03 2015
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 Guides 1
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51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 03 2015
Zort
Hiking12.80 Miles 600 AEG
Hiking12.80 Miles   6 Hrs      2.13 mph
600 ft AEG25 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
New Year's in Aravaipa Canyon

A chilly five-mile splash in from the west turned to dinner rain, overnight snow and cold glory in the morning. Really no way to keep your feet warm in these conditions. Neoprene socks help, as does cinching the legs of your waterproof pants down over your boots. Gore-Tex or no, the deeper creek crossings will swamp your hiking boots.

Young deer, especially a buck were spotted a few times in the canyon and around camp between Horse Camp and Virgus Canyons. Beautiful way to spend New Year's Eve and Day.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Moderate
Many leaves on the ground, buts colors still on the trees though fading
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May 04 2014
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 Guides 1
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51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Devil's Canyon HikeGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Canyoneering avatar May 04 2014
Zort
Canyoneering4.80 Miles 1,093 AEG
Canyoneering4.80 Miles   10 Hrs      0.87 mph
1,093 ft AEG   4 Hrs   30 Mns Break25 LBS Pack
Basic Canyoneering - Scrambling; easy climbing/downclimbing; frequent hand use; rope recommended; easy exit
A - Dry or little water; shallow or avoidable water; no wet/dry suit
IV - Long, full day, bivy possible
 
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The 4x4 drive in is now easy. Having read the reviews of the approach drive, I was all ready to throw the Taco into 4L and creep along to the trailhead, but the mining company looks to have *very recently* graded out a very reasonable road. (Didn't think to run the GPS - Duh) It mostly follows the original road from what I can tell, and I *did* still use 4H to climb the steep hills, but it was not an epic approach at all. Not much more than 30 min from US60 to the head of Hackberry Canyon.

See also my GPS log of the trip.

Elapsed - Description

0:00 - My girlfriend and I camped out Saturday night at the TH and hit the trail about 9 a.m.
Sunday morning. The descent down Hackberry was as dramatic as I'd hoped it would be. Hoodoo spires, pouroffs, majesty. The 40-foot dryfall was really no problem, though the thought of falling into the cesspool at the bottom was scary. Warm and green and slimy.

1:00 - The confluence with Devil's Canyon. Previously unfamiliar with poison ivy, we were careful to avoid the very obvious "leaves of three". It truly thrives here. Travel was harder in Devil's than Hackberry, and we couldn't enjoy the scenery as much, with all the route finding and bushwacking required.

1:30 - Confluence with Oak Creek. We stopped for a snack. Deb emptied debris from her Keens for the umpteenth time. We had a hard time deciding on footwear. I settled on some old tennis shoes that worked reasonably well in Salome, and Deb went with Keen's and socks. That was not really an awesome choice. At all. So *that's* where I left my toolbox! ;)

2:15 - Coming to big stinky pools in the canyon. Avoiding them by staying creek right.

3:15 - One of several creek crossings.

4:20 - First of the Five Pools. We came prepared with a fair complement of technical gear, and hucking a pool of unknown depth (to either of us) was not going to happen, so we decided to rap down the 15' pouroff. The pair of stainless steel eye bolts looked plenty good to me, so we didn't get to work on any kind of natural anchor. We just ran a length of webbing through the bolts, doubled it, tied an overhand for redundancy, ran a pair of rapides through the webbing and rapped down on ATS devices. This was an exercise in technique and execution, as all technical work should be. I am not affiliated with Imlay Canyon Gear or Canyoneering USA, but I gotta say the 9.2 mm Canyonero polyester rope has worked well for me the few times I've used it so far. Water absorption was very limited, and the static line keeps you from yo-yoing.

Once down to the pool we snacked, swam and took pictures of the fish that appear to be non-native Green Sunfish. I slid down to the mini stink-pool above the next pouroff and had a peek down to the next pool. Impressive drop!

It was breezy, the waterfall was flowing lightly, the water was refreshingly cold, and it was lovely. But...we were starting to run out of time, so we decided against going any further down creek.

6:00 - In warm weather it's great to soak your clothes before hitting the trail, so I took a last plunge in the big pool before gearing up. Deb belayed me up the short climb, which is easy, except when you're dripping wet and wearing tennis shoes with mediocre rubber. I belayed her from the top, and she made the climb look easy. We were off!

6:50 - We went high creek right, and I spotted a wall of stacked stones with an old wire and post gate up on the hillside - had to check it out. Not much to see here, other than the oddity of the wall and primitive gate built a long time ago, now choked with jojoba. No idea what that was all about.

7:15 - Not long after getting back down to the creek bed I noted the cooling temps, the slanting light, the great conditions for reptiles, but decided against getting Deb wound up about snakes in the tall, seeding yellow grass. Two minutes later her shrill expletive let me know I had just walked past probably the biggest gopher snake I had ever seen. It was easily five and probably closer to six feet in length, and very healthy looking. Pics and some bad video were taken. This colubrid was quite calm, and I resisted spoiling the mood by grabbing it, as I normally would. No other snakes were spotted.

7:40 - Creek left halfway between the first pool and Oak Creek looked better to me than creek right, and I took us on a misadventure high above the creek bottom. There was a very fine trail up there for about 50 yards, and then nothing. We snacked. I videoed a saguaro skeleton standing on the hillside, ribs clacking in the wind. We eventually did some hardcore bushwhacking to get back down to the creek, collecting scrapes and grass seeds as we went.

8:30 - Back to the creek bottom just before the confluence with Oak Creek. Oh, so _this_ is what hiking trails is like! ;) It was pretty easy travel from here on out, with only very minor bushwhacking. We quickly passed Oak Creek and began the ascent of the very scenic Hackberry Canyon back to the truck.

9:45 - Chips, salsa, bevvies and smiles!
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Devil's Creek - South of Oak Canyon Light flow Light flow
Scummy pools, light flow

dry Hackberry Creek Dry Dry
Stagnant pools only
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Jul 15 2013
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 Guides 1
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 Photos 94
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51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Piestewa Peak Summit Trail #300Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Run/Jog avatar Jul 15 2013
Zort
Run/Jog2.20 Miles 1,180 AEG
Run/Jog2.20 Miles      34 Mns   38 Secs3.81 mph
1,180 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Hot, sweaty noon hike today rewarded me with 19 poignant reminders of the sacrifices made by the Granite Mountain Hotshots, and of first-responders everywhere, every day, every year. See my photo from this 7/15/2013 hike from the summit.
Z-
Culture
Culture
Old Glory
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Jun 07 2013
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 Guides 1
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51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Piestewa Peak Summit Trail #300Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 07 2013
Zort
Hiking2.20 Miles 1,180 AEG
Hiking2.20 Miles      38 Mns   3.47 mph
1,180 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Doh! - Phoenix pools are closed on Fridays :? Had to hike after work instead of swim training.
5 p.m. 108° = smelter skelter in a late Spring swelter. Approx 22 min up, 16 min down followed by two hours of cool down to feel normal again. And the water fountain is still not running cold. #crematoria
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Jun 05 2013
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 Guides 1
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51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Piestewa Peak Summit Trail #300Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 05 2013
Zort
Hiking2.20 Miles 1,180 AEG
Hiking2.20 Miles
1,180 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Trying to get into the habit of posting trip reports here, to give back so-to-speak. HAZ is such a great resource!

So, I hike Piestewa a couple times a week as a lunchtime break. The main summit trail is the fastest, so it sees the most action. Couple bits of current info: midday parking is a breeze in the main lot this time of year; the fountain was not refrigerated when I hiked on Monday; and the trail is nice and empty (though that could be bad if you get into trouble). Oh, and it's really hot out there. Enjoy and be safe!
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Dec 30 2012
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 Guides 1
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51 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Brown's PeakPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 30 2012
Zort
Hiking4.70 Miles 1,363 AEG
Hiking4.70 Miles   1 Hour   45 Mns   2.69 mph
1,363 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Saturday, Dec. 29, 2012- There wasn't much snow on the road to Lone Pine Saddle, but nearly all of Trail 133 to Brown's Peak was covered in a few inches to a foot of snow. Mostly it was solid and reasonably easy to stay on top of. Breaking through the crust took effort. Several groups were on the trail this day, and perhaps the day or so before, as evidenced by the snow being fairly well packed down. Another day of melting, trampling and re-freezing will make things pretty dicey up there. Neither trekking poles nor instep crampons were necessary for us on Saturday, but would probably be advisable soon.

We hiked to the unnamed(?) saddle below the peak. Ascending the couloir would have been folly, with all of the snow and the cold conditions. So, we took in the views, snacked, shot a few photos and headed back down. Lesson learned; when the peaks are white, chances are slim you'll be able to summit them. Still, beautiful crisp snow hiking led to fantastic views of the Mogollon Rim, the Valley and all the major peaks within 50 miles or more.
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average hiking speed 2.17 mph

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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