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13 triplogs
Sep 28 2018
larbrad
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Bob Bear Trail #18 - Fossil CreekCamp Verde, AZ
Camp Verde, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 28 2018
larbrad
Hiking8.57 Miles 1,753 AEG
Hiking8.57 Miles   4 Hrs   22 Mns   2.55 mph
1,753 ft AEG   1 Hour    Break
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
We drove from Mesa, arrived at the TH at about 9:35am. It was the perfect day for a visit to Fossil Springs and then down to the waterfall and toilet bowl. We obtained our permit and parking pass ahead of time and there was a ranger at the very beginning of the road to check that all things were in order. I hadn't been down to Fossil Creek in several years - last time was in my car! The TH is only about 2 miles after leaving the pavement and there appears to be parking for about 20-25 vehicles. The trail is well marked. The only confusion was that all of the signs at the TH state that "this trail does not go to the waterfall". Well, we had hoped to go to both the spring and the waterfall so we just hoped for the best when we got down there. We descended in about an hour & half, trail is rocky in some places and so we were careful not to slip. We arrived at the bottom and the trail crosses the dry creek bed at one point, just look for a wooden sign hanging from a tree on the other side and you'll know where to go. Soon you get to a fork in the trail that is going down the north side of the creek bed - that sign points you to the spring. It is a short walk to the spring and it is worth seeing - there's a good flow of water coming right up from the ground - although when you get further down the creek you wonder how could that amount of water soon turn into much more water??!! We back-tracked from the Spring back to the trail and took the route that is marked by another trail sign that says "To Dam". From there, it is only about a half mile to the waterfall and toilet bowl. What a magnificent sight and location!! And, we had it all to ourselves which is amazing - not a soul there (although we encountered 5 hikers ascending while we were descending). We swam (water was cool, but not really take-your-breath-away cold) and relaxed for about an hour, then started back up. On the way up we passed 15 or so more people going down - one playing rather loud annoying music - glad we weren't going to be needing to share the serenity of the creek with that background music! We climbed steadily and made it out in about the same time it took to descend - an hour and a half. All the way up my daughter and I were commenting about how much we LOVE Arizona. We live in the best state!! A comment to all hikers and campers (if allowed) who've done this trail - thank you to all - it is so clean down there, I didn't see any trash. Pats on the back! :app:

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Fossil Springs Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
A healthy flow by my standards - really kind of surprising given our state of drought, but so grateful!
_____________________
Sep 25 2018
larbrad
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Los Caballos Trail #638Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 25 2018
larbrad
Hiking15.80 Miles 1,510 AEG
Hiking15.80 Miles   5 Hrs      3.16 mph
1,510 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I started the hike from the "East" Trailhead off of Forest Service Road 136 - it was more like 2.6 miles from the junction of US60 & 260 as you're heading toward Heber/Payson. It was a perfect day - almost - to have taken this entire loop (the "almost" is only mentioned because the brief but strong rain created some havoc on the trail). There seemed to be more horse use than foot use evident on this trail. The trail is well marked although careful observance of the white diamond trail markers is essential in a few places. I did have to backtrack one time to make sure I picked up the trail. The clouds were a little grey and the forecast gave a 20% chance of rain. Well, it began to sprinkle and I thought, "this is heaven". But, then it let it down pretty hard and soon the trail was running full of water making it impossible to stay on the trail and slowing my progress. As is typical of Arizona rains, it soon stopped, the water stopped running, but then I continued to contend with the slippery mud - needing to stay off the trail for a mile or so. As the loop turned south, I found dry ground again and picked up the pace. I didn't observe any wildlife, but there were tracks all over and I could hear a bugling elk. I say no wildlife, but I did run into about a half dozen cows with calves who simply gave me the curious eye but could care less I was there. I didn't see another soul the whole day and it was a peaceful although tiring walk. There are portions of the trail that require you to walk on small river rock and it pained my feet dearly. If you don't have time to do the full loop, I highly recommend going south out of the trailhead parking lot as if doing the loop backwards (clockwise). If you do this, you can enjoy a wonderful serene, flat and smooth walk through some great ponderosa pine forest. However, doing the full loop counter-clockwise does take you into some sections of the burned area (I believe from the Rodeo-Chedeski fire) which is interesting. This trail could be quite warm if taken in the full summer sun because good chunks of the distance are in relatively open terrain - mostly scrub oaks. By and large a great trail and well worth taking.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation None
Temps were in the 60's & 70's, I didn't observe any leaves changing colors yet.
_____________________
Jul 04 2018
larbrad
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
East Baldy Trail #95Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 04 2018
larbrad
Hiking14.80 Miles 2,285 AEG
Hiking14.80 Miles   5 Hrs      2.96 mph
2,285 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I decided to celebrate the 4th of July with a nice hike up the the East Baldy Trail #95. I arrived at the trailhead about 9:00am and the weather was perfect. I encountered only three other hikers on my way up. The trail was in very good condition all the way up until you reached about mile 5-5.5 when there were some fallen trees. It looks like some maintenance has been done since some of the earlier triplogs because I would only say I had to carefully cross about a dozen downed trees - many others had been cut and cleared. I saw no wildlife at all, a bear had torn up the bark on a tree beside the trail and there were plenty of deer and elk tracks in the trail itself. On the way back down, I met a large group (10 or so people) at the 2.5 mi point that were looking out from the rocky viewpoint. Finally, I caught up with two horsemen just down from the rocky outlook that were resting their mounts. I had hoped to get some rain - I've forgotten what it feels like! It is dry but there was more green foliage on this trail than about any other you'd hope to see. It was a great hike and a beautiful day. I love the freedom to do such things as this on a day we celebrate our liberty.
_____________________
Jun 19 2017
larbrad
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Abineau - Bear Jaw LoopFlagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 19 2017
larbrad
Hiking7.00 Miles 2,115 AEG
Hiking7.00 Miles   3 Hrs   15 Mns   2.15 mph
2,115 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
It doesn't look like anyone has recently written up a triplog on this beautiful loop hike beneath the north slopes of Humphrey's Peak. I did the loop in a clockwise direction which means you go up the Bear Jaw Trail and down the Abineau. I thought going up Bear Jaw was tough enough - not sure I would even want to tackle going up the Abineau. It was one of those days when it was projected to be in the high teens temperature-wise in Phoenix and I had a reason to be in Flagstaff so decided to take in a nice hike. I was totally rewarded. Temp at start was maybe in the low 80's. Still not bad considering the alternatives in AZ this time of year. I encountered only four other hikers after starting my hike around 2pm. I even had to cross a field of snow at one point on the trail plus some thunder and brief showers that cooled the air into the low 60's at completion. I agree with everyone that this could be one of the top hikes in AZ for a view, trees, cool weather and challenging while not a killing hike. The sign-in book at the point in the trail where the Bear Jaw and Abineau trails intersect showed a lot of activity each day, so clearly this is a popular hike and every reason to be so. I love Arizona!
_____________________
Mar 31 2017
larbrad
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Dutchman Trail #104Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 31 2017
larbrad
Hiking18.25 Miles 2,810 AEG
Hiking18.25 Miles   7 Hrs   30 Mns   2.70 mph
2,810 ft AEG      45 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
A small cold front moved in that would make Friday, March 31, 2017 a perfect hiking day. I opted to do the Dutchman Trail #104 from Peralta Trailhead to First Water. Started about 7:30am and the day proved to be spectacular. I love the solitude and ease of walking along the first stretch through Barkley Basin through some wonderful stands of saguaro cactii. The climb up through Miner's Canyon to the pass northeast of Miner's Needle is a pleasant, not difficult, climb with some great rock formations to look at. From the pass to Bluff Spring Canyon was uneventful but so nice to soak in all that makes spring flowers from recent rains a sight to behold. As I approached and entered into La Barge Canyon I had this overwhelming feeling - I NEED TO REPENT!!!! I'm an Arizona native and have never set foot into this canyon - that my friends is a sin. I was amazed at the beauty, vegetation, water, tree canopy over the trail - it was an awesome experience to be there and I LOVED it. Even though it was a cool day, as I was walking along the sandy trail with knee-high grass on both sides just before the spot where Charlebois Canyon and La Barge Canyon merge, there was a nice Western Diamondback stretched out across the trail. I saw him in plenty of time, but he still spooked a little and assumed the most unusual strike pose I'd ever seen (see picture). He wasn't about to move, so I had to nudge him back into the grass with a stick before moving on. Then, still a little nervous, I slowed my pace and kept the stick with me for a while (lol). When I got out of the grass and started west beneath Black Mountain toward Needle Canyon I encountered another venomous friend, a Gila Monster (see picture) who was, of course, unconcerned with me. Water was to be found in most creek beds still, a few Mexican Poppies still out, but plenty of yellow from the Brittle Bushes stained my pants from brushing through them. Beautiful sights, great weather and another heavenly day in the Superstition Wilderness.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial
Brittle Bush, Mexican Poppies, Hedgehog Cactus

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Bluff Spring Dripping Dripping

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max LaBarge Spring Dripping Dripping

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Upper First Water Creek Light flow Light flow
_____________________
Feb 23 2017
larbrad
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Weaver's Needle CrosscutPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 23 2017
larbrad
Hiking8.97 Miles 2,516 AEG
Hiking8.97 Miles   4 Hrs   40 Mns   2.14 mph
2,516 ft AEG      28 Mns Break
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Took the Bluff Springs Trail to the Terrapin Trail. Almost exactly 9 tenths of a mile after going onto the Terrapin Trail is where the Weaver's Needle Crosscut Trail leaves the Terrapin to the west. I came up looking for it earlier in the week and couldn't find it - only after downloading the trail onto my Garmin and referring to it was I able to locate the beginning of the trail. Once I found it, I discovered why it was so difficult. There are no cairns on the Terrapin Trail, at least as of this week, and it looks like the maintenance crew had decided to try and hide the trail by placing numerous Century Plant stalks and rocks across the trail. Stepping over the Century Plant stalks and rocks, the trail-of-use is pretty easy to follow all the way across to the Peralta Trail. I have to agree with other hikers' opinions that the little flat basin that is found along this path between the climb from the Terrapin and the descent to the Peralta is truly one of the most serene and beautiful places I've seen - I loved being there. I followed the trail-of-use all the way back to the Peralta and discovered that the maintenance crews have done the same thing on the west end of this trail - they have planted prickly pear in the trail and scattered rocks to reduce the likelihood of anyone on the Peralta trail finding this little gem of a trail. It was a beautiful day and there was still water in most washes and ravines from last weekend's rains - even up in the "Needle Basin".

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max East Boulder @ Pinon Camp Medium flow Medium flow
_____________________
Jul 05 2014
larbrad
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Humphreys Summit Trail #151Flagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 05 2014
larbrad
Hiking10.25 Miles 3,313 AEG
Hiking10.25 Miles   7 Hrs      1.46 mph
3,313 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
We had our RV near Kendrick Mountain and stayed there Friday night, July 4th. I arrived at the trailhead at 6:45am after hearing it rain nearly all night. Never having done this hike before, I was worried that the trail would be muddy. The morning was perfect however and while the trail was moist, it wasn't at all muddy - I think it must be the sandy, volcanic soil. Nonetheless, I started up and it wasn't long before I realized I was not in the kind of shape this climb was going to require of me. I plodded along at a slow pace that my lungs and legs would permit. I loved hiking in the trees, it was cool, moist, fresh air and passing clouds - all of which beat being in Phoenix on this date. I had been forewarned about the false summits, and sure enough, they faked me out too. I was soooo tired, I just wanted to get to the top. I kept thinking that this hike is so much more difficult than the rim-to-rim I did two years ago. I finally reached the summit in about 3 1/2 hours. The clouds parted fairly frequently to catch some good views which were well worth the trip. Then, within minutes of reaching the summit a light rain started, so I tried to hustle down. There really is no "hustling" down though, my legs were quite rubbery and I sacrificed time for sure footing. The rain came and went, though never hard enough to drench me - even had some hail for a short stint. A day later, the memory of this hike is all good, none of my "why am I doing this?" thoughts are lingering. I suspect it means I'll try this again some time. I would really like to see the B-24 site some time. I had my GPS with me and had downloaded the "official" GPS route to the B-24, but the official route really just follows the trail and never left the trail, so I didn't get to the crash. I'm thinking that I need to try one of the other "unofficial" GPS routes. And, heck, if you get to 11K feet or so to get to the wreck site, then you might as well summit again, right? I was surprised how many people there were on the trail - and a lot that were in really good shape that just flew by me. Good for them!!
Culture
Culture
Old Glory
Named place
Named place
Humphreys Peak
_____________________
Sep 14 2012
larbrad
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 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Rim to RimNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 14 2012
larbrad
Hiking20.00 Miles
Hiking20.00 Miles   9 Hrs   13 Mns   2.59 mph
   1 Hour   30 Mns Break15 LBS Pack
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I finally satisfied one of my yearnings by completing the rim-to-rim hike of the Grand Canyon. I took the south to north route, descending on the South Kiabab trail and ascending on the North Kiabab trail. Considering I made reservations for accommodations at both the south and north rim nearly a year in advance, I couldn't have been more fortunate to have the best weather imaginable. My wife and I stayed at the Mastwik Lodge on Thursday night (by the way, I highly recommend this lodge - we've stayed at the El Tovar before and the Mastwik's room was much larger and our private patio looked out at the forest with absolutely no other structure in view - it was really nice) and then I had a pioneer cabin reserved on the north rim for Friday night. I caught the hiker's express bus out in front of the Backcountry Office and arrived at the South Kiabab trailhead about 5:30am. I made great time going down, arriving at the suspension bridge at 2.5 hrs. Since there were about 30 hikers on the bus, the trail was a little congested to start, but quickly broke up. I used trekking poles and they saved me from slipping a few times and they help cushion the knees on this steep downhill trail. Consistent with what I had read, the views on this trail as the sun is rising are "must-see's". The canyon is so incredibly expansive and the variation of colors are breath-taking. I was in heaven. Once I reached the bottom, I didn't want to stop because it was still early and I wanted to traverse the narrow canyon while it was still in complete shade. I believe that was a good decision even though the warmest it got the whole day might have been in the mid-80's (mid-40's when I started, shed the fleece after about 30 minutes of hiking). I really liked the North Kiabab Trail the way it follows Bright Angel Creek for so many miles and the sound of running water makes this portion very enjoyable. My knees were still feeling the after-effects of the downhill pounding from the South Kiabab, so near the Cottonwood campground (at about 5.5 hr mark) is where I took my first real rest - emptied my pockets, took off my shoes and sat in the creek up to my waste for about 30 minutes to give my knees and thighs some nice cooling off. The water is COLD, so it felt really good - after the initial shock that is. While there, I ate my orange and apple. After my rest and lunch, I took off. I never ran out of water, had some powders that replenish electrolytes and they seemed to work OK. I also brought some high-energy gels but I can't say they were any more beneficial (and must less tasty) than the trail mix I brought along too. I had always wondered how I would fare after having traversed nearly 14-15 miles before arriving at the steady climb to the top of the north rim. I have to say that the incline never really gave me trouble, the views were always so beautiful that I hardly noticed I was climbing and was usually surprised to realize I had climbed as far as I had. With that said, the hike began to take its toll on me at about the Supai Tunnel. From there to the top was the most beautiful scenery, but the odor from the mule droppings and urine was over-powering and really detracted from the beauty of the surroundings. Also, I began to experience some cramping in the calves and hamstrings - nothing that took me out of commission, but a tightening that caused me to slow down and take shorter steps. I finished the hike in just over 9 hours and really enjoyed it. There is nothing like the Grand Canyon. :y:
_____________________
Jan 21 2012
larbrad
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 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Pass Mountain Mega-Loop, AZ 
Pass Mountain Mega-Loop, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jan 21 2012
larbrad
Hiking8.50 Miles 1,620 AEG
Hiking8.50 Miles   2 Hrs   50 Mns   3.13 mph
1,620 ft AEG      7 Mns Break
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This is one of my favorite hikes as the trailhead is within walking distance of my home. I have done the Pass Mountain Trail many times, but I call this one the "Mega-Loop" because it adds some distance to the usual trail. This hike starts from the trailhead where Meridian Road ends at the foot of the Goldfield Mountains. It makes no difference whether you go clockwise or counter-clockwise, but I like to knock off the biggest elevation gain early, so I chose counter-clockwise. At the trailhead, start north and trend toward the northeast and eventually you'll top out at a "pass". As you continue to go north down off the pass, the trail is well-defined and easy to follow. Just as the trail starts to flatten out, keep your eye to the left hand (west side of the trail) and watch for some rock cairns. This will help you know when to start heading west. This is my favorite part of the hike as it is seldom traveled and on some days following a rainy period (like right now) there are places where you're walking on a carpet of grass. :) Also, it is along this section (east to west) where the trail can kind of disappear on you, but if you keep an eye out for the cairns you'll have no problem and if you can't find any, then just keep heading west and you'll intersect with the main Pass Mountain Loop Trail. The rest of the hike is all on the Pass Mountain Loop and will bring you back to the Meridian trailhead. Anyways, this is a medium length hike within easy reach of the east valley and if you're lucky, you'll see some wildlife. In the past, I've seen javelina, deer, desert tortoise, coyote (of course), one Kitt Fox, one bobcat and one Gila Monster. My GPS said this was 9.58 miles, but when I transferred the track to my laptop, it now says 8.5 miles. Whatever.
_____________________
Oct 08 2011
larbrad
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Broadway CavePhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 08 2011
larbrad
Hiking4.20 Miles
Hiking4.20 Miles   4 Hrs      1.05 mph
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
My daughter and I took three of her boys (age 9,7,4) and two of my other grandsons (age 9 & 4) up to Broadway cave. We were looking for adventure - you know how boys love caves. :) The trip went well and we all returned safely. The older boys had no problem whatsoever, the younger ones needed some help occasionally. The trail on the flater portion of the trail is very rocky with loose, baseball-sized rocks that make walking a little tricky. As you begin the climb up to the cave it does get a little steep, but we had no difficulty finding a trail all the way to the top. The view was nice, it is a cave - albeit a shallow one - and the boys all had a great time. Adults could make this walk in much better time, but with kids we took it slow and easy.
_____________________
May 11 2011
larbrad
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 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Tonto Trail: South Kaibab to Bright AngelNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar May 11 2011
larbrad
Hiking16.80 Miles 3,200 AEG
Hiking16.80 Miles   7 Hrs   53 Mns   3.12 mph
3,200 ft AEG   2 Hrs   30 Mns Break15 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I am actually beginning to write this triplog BEFORE I take my hike. I have wanted to do a rim-to-rim hike for quite some time, but for various reasons, I have not. So, finally, I have a couple of days to be at the canyon and I want to test myself to see if I can really make it. I take reasonably strenuous hikes regularly in the valley, through all kinds of weather, even the hottest days. My hikes usually range in the 5-10 mile distance and the hill behind my house is about 800' elevation change in 2.5 miles. I've done other hikes like Flatiron and Carney Springs that are pretty good climbs. Not even close to the canyon of course. But I'm wondering how I will match up to a fairly good, long-distance day hike at the Grand Canyon at a steady, but not fast, pace. I'm also wondering how hiking at a higher elevation (after arriving from the Valley the day before) will affect my stamina.

Heeding the warnings of going to the river and back in one day in the month of May, I decided to decrease both the distance and the elevation changes by taking the South Kiabab/Tonto/Bright Angel Loop. I figure this will be a good test for a 56-year old hiker who considers himself to be in fairly good shape - and more importantly for me - tell me if I have what I need to do a true rim-to-rim hike.

Let's see how my "plan" compares to the actual, shall we? My plan is to take the shuttle to Yaki Point departing at 5:00am from the Village and hopefully get started down the trail no later than 6am. My knees are a little aged and can usually feel the affects of prolonged downhill plodding, so I expect this to be a pretty true test right out of the chute. Nonetheless, because of my quick descents that I make on my regular trail near Usery Park, I predict that I'll cover the 4.4 miles (and 3,190') descent down to the junction with the Tonto trail in 2 hours. Then, according to the trail guide, the Tonto is a 4.5 mile relatively flat walk over to the Bright Angel. I think I can also do this in 2 hours. So that would put me at Indian Gardens on the Bright Angel trail around 10am. I think I'm being pretty conservative to think that it will take me 3.5 hours climb the 4.6 miles out of the canyon from Indian Gardens putting me back at the lodge around 1:30pm. Thus, covering the 13.8+/- in 7.5 hours. I expect to top out saying to myself, "well, that was a good work-out and I am tired, but not so tired that I couldn't have finished a rim-to-rim by going another 6 miles and a couple thousand more feet up." This could be interesting. I'm pausing my writing now, and will resume when I have completed the loop.

I made the actual hike on the day planned - May 11, 2011. I awoke at 4:30am, dressed and went to catch the Hiker Express bus at the Bright Angel Lodge bus stop. I ate my muffin and downed half a Gatorade while waiting. The bus came just as scheduled at 5am, made a few stops and dropped us off at the South Kiabab Trailhead. It was COLD - had snowed (but not stuck) the night before. I wore plenty of layers. By the time got myself all situated, I was about the last one started on the trail and I took it plenty easy. I had purchased a set of trekking poles from REI and all I can say is that I was glad I had them. I found the trail to be steep, but not bad going down. I reached the West Tonto Trail sign in 1 hr 40 minutes. At that point I began peeling off layers. I headed west on the Tonto. Burro spring was dripping and Pipe Spring was running. It was a very nice comfortable and non-exertion hike. I arrived at Indian Gardens at 3 hours, 50 minutes (amazingly close to my plan!). I definitely did NOT hurry on the Tonto, making multiple stops for pictures and just gazing at the beauty of the inner canyon. I felt so good at Indian Gardens, that I didn't want to exit the canyon yet, so I walked out to Plateau Point which added another 3 miles to the trip. Got back to Indian Gardens, ate some lunch, mixed up some more electrolyte juice and started for the top. I made the ascent in 2 hours and 30 minutes, arriving at 1:30pm, right on schedule but having traversed 3 more miles than originally planned. I really enjoyed this loop and arrived at the top tired, but not exhausted. Total time start to finish including rests - 8 hours. I gained the confidence that I can certainly tackle the rim-to-rim which I hope to do perhaps this fall. The Grand Canyon is so beautiful! I loved it.

For further information, I took two bladders of water for my camelback - one too many. I had one Gatorade and one Gatorade bottle with just water - I used these to mix my electrolyte powder. I didn't suffer any cramping and had only trail mix and a snickers bar for food. But, as another hiker also reported on this loop, better to have too much than too little.
_____________________
Feb 05 2011
larbrad
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 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Carney Spring-Dacite Mesa-Peralta Loop, AZ 
Carney Spring-Dacite Mesa-Peralta Loop, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Feb 05 2011
larbrad
Hiking8.00 Miles
Hiking8.00 Miles   5 Hrs      1.60 mph
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners none no partners
We parked at the Carney Springs "wide spot" in the Peralta Road. Forgot to turn on my GPS for about the first 1/2 mile, but up we went on the Carney Springs (West Boulder Saddle) trail (at least I THINK these are both the same trails, please correct if wrong). I like this ascent better than Fremont Saddle or Flatiron. Once on top, followed a route downloaded from HikeAZ for the Dacite Mesa - a good route although some bushwacking at the tail end. The trail disappeared - from our view anyways - but we could see the Peralta Trail below and it was a matter of just working our way down. Fantastic little loop, Carney Springs to Dacite Mesa to Fremont Saddle and then down the Peralta. Fantastic day and weather was spectacular!
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2 archives
Feb 06 2010
larbrad
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 Guides 1
 Routes 5
 Photos 39
 Triplogs 13

66 male
 Joined Feb 08 2010
 Mesa, AZ
Cavalry Trail #239Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 06 2010
larbrad
Hiking17.90 Miles 300 AEG
Hiking17.90 Miles   7 Hrs      2.56 mph
300 ft AEG
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This is my first post, so I'm not sure I know what I'm doing here. Have patience. I wanted to do a nice long loop in the Superstition Wilderness. My mileage numbers here are cumulative miles from the start. I started at the First Water Trailhead and took the Dutchman's Trail (#104) to its intersection with the Cavalry Trail #239 (8.42mi), then took the Cavalry Trai (#239) to where it intersected with the Boulder Canyon Trail (#103)(12.2mi), then followed the Boulder Canyon Trail to its intersection with the Second Water Trail (#236)(13.9mi), then took the 2nd Water Trail (#236) back to where it intersects with the Dutchman's Trail (#104) (17.4mi) and back to the trailhead at 17.9mi.

Nearly every creek was flowing with water, it was fantastic. My trusty trail dog, "Jackson", a beautiful, smart and well-behaved chocolate Lab helped me find the trail in a couple of spots - especially crossing the bouldered creekbeds.

I would do this again. I encountered a fair number of fellow hikers on the Dutchman's Trail, only one on the Cavalry Trail and none on the section of the Boulder Canyon Trail until I got to the end of the Second Water Trail, which of course, was quite a popular walk that day.
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average hiking speed 2.18 mph

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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