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Sep 30 2022
avatar

 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Redfield Canyon to Swamp Springs CanyonTucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 30 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking4.00 Miles 830 AEG
Hiking4.00 Miles   5 Hrs      1.33 mph
830 ft AEG   2 Hrs    Break15 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I spent more time researching this trip than I did hiking it, not counting the hours it took to get there. I wanted to make sure I did not go on private land, either driving or walking, and since there are no trails, I scoped out a reasonable hike plan. There will be an HAZ guide when I am done today. Hope someday someone can extend the guide all they way up Swamp Springs Canyon to Jackson Cabin. That would make a great traverse of this wilderness.

This area was on my to-do list as one of the Arizona Wilderness Areas without much information available. The access path from trailhead down to the canyon was pretty easy to map from aerial photos, although I did get off a couple times, plus it was hidden at times in the tall grass. There are a few tiny cairns showing the way.

I didn’t have time to go as far up Swamp Spring Canyon as I wanted, as I had some errands to do in Tucson before I headed home to Phoenix, but it really was gorgeous and cool under the trees in the canyon compared to the heat at the top. I even had a breeze blowing in my face both going in and coming out.

At one point while walking along the bank, a rattler insistently warned me off. I couldn’t see him/her/them, but I did the valiant and respectful thing and stepped into the stream until well clear.

I’m not the fastest 4x4 driver in the world. It took me 1 ¾ hours each direction from N. Cascabel Road. The views along the road will make you stop for pictures, as I did, as you can see all the way from the Catalinas and Rincons to the Galurios, with big sky and canyons in between.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation None
Not yet.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
Exactly one
Sep 23 2022
avatar

 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Bell Trail #13Camp Verde, AZ
Camp Verde, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 23 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking10.10 Miles 2,255 AEG
Hiking10.10 Miles   9 Hrs      1.44 mph
2,255 ft AEG   2 Hrs    Break15 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
After a pleasant summer in Connecticut, I came back to Phoenix, but altogether too soon. This trip was hot! 61° when I left the car, but 84° when I got back.

As this is a well-known spot for playing in the creek, the parking lot + overflow has a huge capacity, but I was the only car when I headed out at 7 am. There is an outhouse at the trailhead. I did not see anyone until almost to The Crack, when one hiker almost caught up with me.

I stopped at The Crack, where I had a snack and refilled my water, then rock hopped across and continued up the hill to The Rim. Overnight camping is not allowed anywhere near The Crack; it is a 500 foot climb to the first allowed camping spot. It is a nice spot, but a long way from the play area. Signs at the trailhead threaten fines to anyone who ignores this restriction.

There is good signage all along this trail, but the funniest one I saw is just as you arrive at the Rim and exit the wilderness, “Trail difficult to find beyond this point.” Indeed, the trail abruptly disappears in the grass beyond the sign. No problem for me, though, as this was my planned turnaround point anyway. The meadow on the summit is beautiful and I spent an hour there.

It was getting hot by the time I got back down to the creek, so rather than rock hopping, I put on my wading shoes and forded up to knee deep. It felt soo good! There were several people around the Crack, but I didn’t stay around to socialize. The clouds were starting to build, and I could hear a few rumbles of thunder, but all the way back to the trailhead I met people still coming in, as late as 4 pm. Perhaps I am overly sensitive to the concept of flash flood, but I was glad to be back across the creek and on higher ground.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Moderate
There was a mix of late season flowers.
Sep 17 2022
avatar

 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
View Point-North Mingus LoopPrescott, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 17 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking4.25 Miles 1,322 AEG
Hiking4.25 Miles   3 Hrs   48 Mns   1.29 mph
1,322 ft AEG      30 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Took a leisurely walk on the View Point - North Mingus Loop, going counterclockwise. Lots of wildflowers out, and the view was good, but a little hazy.

The road to the trailhead is easily driven in a normal car. Note that the parking area is a fee area, so we used my lifetime federal pass to park. There is a nice outhouse at the trailhead. On a beautiful Saturday, we only saw 3 other people on the trail.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial
I have attempted to identify as many of my wildflower pictures as possible. If you think I got it wrong, don't hesitate to let me know. In addition to the pictures, I think I saw Birdbill Dayflower and Desert Globemallow
Aug 27 2022
avatar

 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Shenipsit Trail: Somers to EllingtonTolland, CT
Tolland, CT
Hiking avatar Aug 27 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking11.30 Miles 1,942 AEG
Hiking11.30 Miles   7 Hrs   45 Mns   1.46 mph
1,942 ft AEG10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
With this hike, I’ve completed the Shenipsit Trail, except for the boring road bits, and an isolated section along Shenipsit Lake, which I don’t feel compelled to hike. I created guides for the southern and central sections, but kingsnake was here first on the northern section. Some trail has been added since the guide was published. I hiked all the way from the current north terminus at the intersection of Old Springfield Road and Greaves Road in Stafford Springs south to Grahaber Road near Bonair Hill Road in Tolland. The one-way adventure is 11.3 miles, AEG 1942’.

Update to the guide: The observation deck has been rebuilt and is nice. A good place to look above the treetops well into Massachusetts. You can see for miles and miles and miles and miles and miles.

There is good parking at the north terminus, about 0.1 mi up Greaves Road. At the southern end, there is grassy shoulder on the south side of Grahaber where my wife met me. If the grassy shoulder doesn’t appeal to you, official parking per the Connecticut Forest and Park Association is at the cul-de-sac at the end of Bonair Hill Road, about 2/3 mile away.

This part of the Shenipsit is well-maintained, and pleasant all the way. I ran into the trail steward, a spritely 83 years old, with his gloves and loppers. It had rained hard the day before, and the ferns encroach the trail, so I got a little wet at times, but it was pleasant in the late summer heat.

Although the Shenipsit State Forest is criss-crossed with two-tracks, and potentially wheeled vehicles, the north section down to Parker Road is on hiker-only single track. South of there, the trail follows on or near two-track, and there were some unmuffled bikes nearby that took away some of the experience of solitude. There is also a gun range just north of the trail intersection with Gulf Road and Sodom Road that impacted the experience somewhat.

At the end of August, the trees were just starting to turn and lose their leaves. Thanks to the Connecticut Forest and Park Association for making this trail possible.
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Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
Just starting!
Aug 15 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Falmouth Town Forest - Long Pond TrailSoutheast, MA
Southeast, MA
Hiking avatar Aug 15 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking4.00 Miles
Hiking4.00 Miles   1 Hour   30 Mns   2.67 mph
6 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
We are staying in Falmouth for an annual family gathering. My sister and me and our spouses needed to get away from the food for a while, so we took a walk around Long Pond. Parking is at Goodwill Park and Gifford Street. There is an attendant at the park entrance, but no fee for parking. We did the trail counterclockwise around the lake. Views of the lake are limited, but were thankful for good tree cover. The trail is marked with white blazes.
Aug 12 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Hurd SP - Yellow TrailMiddlesex, CT
Middlesex, CT
Hiking avatar Aug 12 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking3.20 Miles 604 AEG
Hiking3.20 Miles   4 Hrs      0.80 mph
604 ft AEG
 
1st trip
I walked the Blue, Yellow and Orange Trails of Hurd State Park, to create guides for each of them. I finished the Red and Green Trails a while ago, and those trails were used to access these.

It was a gorgeous day in mid-August. Temperature at the start was 68°. I was also testing out my new Kota UL pack, trying to figure out the best way to pack it, so I was carrying more weight (17 lb) than usual. A good place to park is the picnic pavilion, but unfortunately, someone has barred the door of the outhouse I mentioned earlier. There is another in the group camp area nearby.

I headed out on the green trail, just far enough to get to the blue trail. I rousted a couple of deer. The blue trail runs along the rim of the ravine and stays near the crest of the ridge as it descends. Pay attention to the blue blazes, as there are numerous side trails. After a sharp switchback, there is a clearing, and the trail begins to climb again. Beware here it is easy to lose the blue trail and an unmarked sharp turn to the right. The Blue Trail ends at an intersection with the Red Trail, where I turned right and headed to the Yellow Trail.

The Yellow Trail leaves the Red Trail near where they both meet the road. There is parking there. The trail is wide as it climbs the hill. It looks like it was an old jeep trail that went up to Split Rock. This area is mostly second growth, but there the remains of a few majestic old trees. The trail intersects with the Orange Trail almost at Split Rock. To stay on the Yellow Trail, turn around and backtrack a few yards and hunt for a trail descending to the left. It is hard to spot but becomes clear as soon as you are on it. At the bottom of the Yellow Trail, I turned left on the Red Trail, to head down to the Orange Trail.

The Orange Trail descends more than I expected through a beautiful open forest of deciduous trees. I thought it would climb directly from the Red Trail, but it descends, then climbs smartly up to Split Rock, which is a great place for lunch. It is unfortunate that there is so much graffiti there, though. At the top, the Orange Trail meets the Yellow Trail (I was here before), and then continues near the ledge with more views off a side trail. Continuing away from the views of the river, the Orange Trail follows along another ridge for a short distance. The trail seems to vanish at the end of the bare rock, but it is there. Just look around and you will see it. After leaving the ridge, the trail descends smartly down to the main road at an intersection with the closed gravel road going over to George Dudley Seymour State Park.

There is no parking at the end of the Orange Trail, but there is an unblazed connector that will take you back to the parking area at the picnic pavilion.
Aug 08 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Shenipsit Trail - Central SectionTolland, CT
Tolland, CT
Hiking avatar Aug 08 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking6.20 Miles 784 AEG
Hiking6.20 Miles   3 Hrs   45 Mns   1.91 mph
784 ft AEG      30 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Today I completed the third and northernmost leg of the central section of the Shenipsit Trail. I hiked from approximately Interstate 84 south to Interstate 284, Vernon to Bolton. My wife dropped my off at the paved parking lot at Walker Reservoir East on Reservoir Road in Vernon. Walking west from the parking lot, at the curve in the road, the trail ducks off to the north.

The trail follows counterclockwise around Walker Reservoir West, which is choked with water lilies. It could be prettier. And the trail is right along the I-84 fence line. It could be quieter. There are lots of roots in this section, so pick up your feet.

There are a couple of bridges constructed by laying boards on aluminum ladder sections. Since ladders aren’t designed to carry much weight in this direction, one of them has buckled. They are cute, though.

Things start looking up after crossing Baker Road. The trail descends into a ravine that has water in it, and is sheltered by oaks, birches, and hemlocks. The sounds of the freeway fade away. Just before a bridge across the Tankerhoosen River, the trail takes a sharp right and follows the river through the Belding Wildlife Management Area. Throughout this area there are many interpretive signs. At the old mill pond, there is a picnic area, nearly lost in tall grass. Cross the spillway of the old millpond; this is the lowest point of the trek, and leave Tankerhoosen River. At Valley Falls Road, the trail leaves the Belding Area and enters Valley Falls Park, where there is plenty of parking, but they may charge for parking at times.

Follow along Valley Falls Pond, crossing Railroad Brook at the spillway. After a short hike along the pond, the trail suddenly climbs the bank, up to a couple of benches with really nice views, and a great spot to stop for lunch. A little farther up, the trail intersects and follows the Hop River State Park Trail, a rails-to-trails project. The Shenipsit is coincident with the Hop River Trail almost all the way to Bolton Notch Pond. It is all uphill, but very gentle.

Just before the pond, the Shenipsit leaves the Hop River Trail, crossing Railroad Brook one last time, and climbing up to views over the waterlily-choked pond. It passes through Bolton’s Freja Park, and finishes up at the Bolton Park-and-Ride, a good place for a pickup.
Aug 06 2022
avatar

 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Shenipsit Trail - Central SectionTolland, CT
Tolland, CT
Hiking avatar Aug 06 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking7.22 Miles 1,159 AEG
Hiking7.22 Miles   4 Hrs   38 Mns   1.82 mph
1,159 ft AEG      40 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I am hiking the 50+ mile Shenipsit Trail in sections. I was prohibited from the wilderness for almost a month by a non-Covid health issue, but I am back to my old self, and happy to be out in the woods again. Today, my wife dropped me off at the trail intersection with Bolton Center Road (CT-85), and I hiked south to Hebron Ave (CT-94). While there is a nice lot where the trail comes out on Birch Mountain Road near Hebron Ave., the nearest good parking at the Bolton end is about a mile away the Bolton Park and Ride at US 44 and I-384. From there, the Shenipsit Trail follows the paved bike path almost to the trailhead on Bolton Center Road.

The first couple of miles, down to Birch Mountain Road, are not in very good shape. The trail is overgrown, blazes are sparse, and at least at one point it was a total bushwhack to find where the trail went. At another point, the trail just blows by a No-Trespassing sign. This does not mean you if you are hiking the trail. Nevertheless, thanks to the Connecticut Forest and Park Association for all they do to maintain the blue-blazed trail system. Keep your wits about you and have the route loaded on your GPS.

After crossing Birch Mountain Road, the trail enters Case Mountain Park, and from here to the end, the trail is in beautiful shape. Case Mountain Park is quite nice. There is a white-blazed carriage road that goes to the summit of Birch Mountain. The Shenipsit Trail crosses it several times. In this area I encountered a large hiking club group and a couple of mountain bikers. Otherwise, I had the day to myself.

It was hot today, in the 90s, and very humid. I was soaked by the time I met my wife at the south end.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
Some blackeyed susans, but that was all.
Jun 21 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Meshomasic ForestMiddlesex, CT
Middlesex, CT
Hiking avatar Jun 21 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking6.10 Miles 656 AEG
Hiking6.10 Miles   2 Hrs   51 Mns   2.52 mph
656 ft AEG      26 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
I am doing the Shenipsit Trail in sections. June 21, 2022 I strolled the section from Hebron Ave (CT-94) south to the trailhead at Toll Gate Rd (CT-2). AEG for this section: 656' Southbound, 1081' Northbound

There is good parking on Hill Street, about 250 yards west of the trail on Hebron Ave. The trail looks like it starts on the lawn in someone’s front yard but is actually on an easement between 3314 and 3338 Hebron Ave in Glastonbury. There is a blue oval sign marking the trail. Leaving the lawn and following blue-painted blazes, the trail dives into the woods, and follows along an algae-covered pond. In a short distance, it comes out on Pheasant Crossing. Just past the second house on the right, there are blue blazes on a white box pointing between the houses, through a little orchard, and back into the woods.

The trail descends along the back boundary of several homes. Although not overgrown, the path is narrow and in tall grass. It passes a lily-covered pond which also has some beaver activity. At 0.8 mi from the trailhead, cross Diamond Lake Road. There is no obvious parking here. Turn right, and in about 100 yards, the trail turns left off the road just before a cable guardrail.

About a quarter mile on, there is another pond, which has the remains of a dam. Here I saw a great blue heron and heard a wood thrush, a scarlet tanager, and a blue jay singing a little chorus. Shortly after, the trail crosses Imperial Drive. There is no obvious parking at the crossing, but it is permitted at the intersection of Imperial Drive and Marlboro Road.

Drop steeply down to a freely flowing Flat Brook, and then climb back up a little to follow the brook at a respectful distance. At about ¾ mile from Imperial Drive, the trail enters the state forest, leaves the brook and heads sharply up the hill. In another ¾ mile or so, the trail begins following the ridge line southwest. There are some views from this ridge in the winter.

Along the ridge, the trail passes through the Zihrup Open Space Preserve of the Kongscut Land Trust. It is marked “Foot Traffic Only”, though there is evidence of wheeled traffic on the Shenipsit Trail. Shortly after John Tom Hill, the highest point in Glastonbury, at 881’, the trail re-enters the state forest. I heard a woodpecker, a yellow-bellied sapsucker according to the Cornell app.

At about 4 miles from the start, you may hear the sounds from the Glastonbury Shooting Range. Then soon after, the sounds of trucks on CT-2. At 5 miles, the trail begins a steep descent off the ridge. Trekking poles are valuable. There are lots of scratches in the rock from people slipping while wearing microspikes.

At 5.2 miles, the trail comes out alongside CT-2. Turn right along the highway, through a field of wood chips, and the blue-blazed trail appears. Following along the highway, near Dark Hollow Brook, there is a green-blazed trail heading down towards the highway. It may be possible to connect with the south section of the Shenipsit Trail using the culvert under the highway, following this trail. That is a problem for another day. The blue blazes continue parallel to the highway and begin following a concrete section of the old New London Turnpike. Pass the shooting range with a toilet, and then at 6.1 miles, arrive at the parking lot at the end of Toll Gate Road.
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Wildflowers Observation None
Mountain Laurel was past its prime.
Jun 17 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Hurd State ParkMiddlesex, CT
Middlesex, CT
Hiking avatar Jun 17 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking4.27 Miles 590 AEG
Hiking4.27 Miles   2 Hrs   2 Mns   2.19 mph
590 ft AEG      5 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
I'm living in Connecticut for the summer, so this gives me lots of opportunities to create new guides for HAZ. Hurd SP is just a short drive from me. I created guides for Red and Green Trails on this trip.
Jun 02 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Sandwich Wilderness Wander, NH 
Sandwich Wilderness Wander, NH
 
Backpack avatar Jun 02 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Backpack42.00 Miles 10,417 AEG
Backpack42.00 Miles4 Days         
10,417 ft AEG25 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I’m spending the summer in New England, and have to keep hiking, so I’ll be logging my trips here. I did a 4-day wander in the Sandwich Range Wilderness of the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire, which sits south of the Kancamagus Highway and north of the town of Sandwich. Within this range are a few peaks: Mount Passaconaway and Whiteface are the most popular peaks, but also there are Sandwich Dome, Mounts Wonalancet and Paugus.

I planned a double figure eight route of about 50 miles that covered much of the wilderness from west to east, parked at the Flat Pond/Whiteface/Intervale parking lot near the middle, and headed out on a Thursday morning. From there, it was a couple miles up Bennett Street to the Flat Mountain/Bennett Street Trailhead, and into the woods. On a Thursday, there were no cars at either trailhead. It was overcast, with lots of mosquitos, as I followed the Bennett Street Trail up to the summit of Sandwich Mountain, following Pond Brook and its tributaries. The hike along Pond Brook is pleasant and easy to follow; the climb after leaving the brook is steeper but reasonable. Near the top, the trail is vague at times but not difficult to find. There was lots of evidence of moose. Due to the overcast, there was no view from Sandwich Mountain. I had lunch and continued west down the Algonquin Trail, with occasional views under the clouds to the Lakes region to the south.

At the intersection with the Black Mountain Pond Trail, I turned down this very steep trail. It drops 1000’ in about a mile, which seems reasonable enough, but there are several sections which are scrambles straight down, not that fun carrying 4 days of supplies. This trail is not marked and sometimes becomes unclear. I spent the night alone at Black Pond, which has two tent pads, and might serve 6-8 friendly people altogether at the only allowed place to camp. There is no trace of the original shelter.

Day 2, I headed south on Black Mountain Pond trail which follows the Beebe River, with several cute waterfalls and riffles to the intersection with the Guinea Pond Trail. Guinea Pond Trail is an old logging railroad bed, and is generally flat. All the bits of the RR are gone, but they must have existed when the wilderness was defined, as the wilderness boundary follows just north of the trail. It is often a steep drop down for stream crossings, as these were previously bridged. Continuing NE, in the rain and clouds of mosquitos, the trail crosses a marshy area. I was able to stay on footlogs and little islands, and kept my feet dry. Eventually the old RR bed becomes the Flat Mountain Pond Trail, and the Guinea Pond Trail bears off right, back in the direction of the Bennett Street Trailhead. I followed Flat Mountain Pond Trail (and old RR bed) all the way to Flat Mountain Pond, where there is a nice, well-maintained shelter including a composting toilet and several permitted tent sites.

After spending a couple hours there, I resisted the temptation to stay there overnight as I needed to get farther along. I followed the trail down the Whiteface River, and camped near the intersection with the McCrillis Trail. It rained overnight, but had stopped by sunrise.

Day 3, I climbed up the McCrillis Trail to the southern summit of Mount Whiteface, which finishes with a scramble of about 100 feet over pretty smooth rock. As I approached the summit, I heard the voices of the first people I had encountered since starting the trip. The climb to Whiteface via Blueberry Ledge Trail is popular, and I ran into 20-30 people over the next few hours. The summit of Whiteface was above the clouds, and sunny, so I dried out my tent and my socks before continuing on.

Continuing north on the Rollins Trail, I passed the true summit of Whiteface, and eventually arrived at the intersection with the well-maintained stairsteps of the Dicey’s Mill trail. I decided I did not need the 400’ climb to the wooded summit of Passaconaway, and bypassed it on the East Loop Trail. Both the Walden Trail and Square Ledge Trail head down from here; I took the Walden Trail, which goes up and down over some steep sections, eventually meeting the Square Ledge Trail again and leveling out on the Lawrence Trail.

The Lawrence Trail east to the Cabin Trail was pleasant, and I turned down the Cabin Trail towards Whitin Brook, where I had identified 3 possible campsites for my last night. Cabin Trail proved to be rough and steep in spots, and after a short distance, I decided to skip my easternmost loop. I backtracked ½ mile to the Kelly Trail, and headed down the canyon of Kelly Brook to the first spring, and set up my tent.

Day 4, I headed down the Kelly Trail. Kelly Brook is beautiful. This was perhaps the prettiest part of the journey. Sections of the brook are worthy of a Japanese garden. The Kelly Trail continues down to the Old Mast Road Trail, and then arrives at the Ferncroft Road Trailhead, which is the main parking area for people climbing Whiteface and Passaconaway. There were probably 25 cars in the lot. As I passed through the trailhead, for about 20 minutes I was hiking in the same direction as about 10 people headed up to the peaks, until I turned off on the McCrillis Path (which is different from the McCrillis Trail previously hiked), and again left the hordes.

McCrillis Path is gentle and pleasant, being the link between the Ferncroft Trailhead and the Flat Pond/Whiteface/Intervale Trailhead. I came to a pile of branches across the trail, suggesting “this is not the way”, but there was only one maintained path going on, with a sign pointing down it to “Sacred Nectar Sanctuary”. After following the maintained path for about 0.2 mi, I realized I was no longer on McCrillis Path, and went back to the intersection. But McCrillis was no longer maintained west of that location, so I just carried on via the maintained path, which leads into the “New Age” Sacred Nectar Sanctuary. Fortunately, regular hand-painted signs point to the exit, and eventually the route got me back to Intervale Road, and a short walk back to my car.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
Not a lot to be seen. Some creeping dogwood. Some trillium. Some Pink Lady's Slipper, the NH state flower. A little Rhodora.
Apr 16 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Oaks and Willows Trail #3Prescott, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 16 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking12.30 Miles 2,350 AEG
Hiking12.30 Miles   8 Hrs   30 Mns   2.14 mph
2,350 ft AEG   2 Hrs   45 Mns Break15 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
I visited Juniper Mesa Wilderness on the back end of a visit to the nearby Apache Creek Wilderness. Juniper Mesa is much more accessible than Apache Creek, with drivable roads almost up to the wilderness boundary. I planned a loop starting from the Oaks and Willows George Wood Canyon trailhead, up Bull Springs Trail #100, a short jaunt on Juniper Mesa Trail #20 back to Trail #3, then north on #3 to the trailhead, and then back all the way on Oaks and Willows Trail #3 to my car. I planned to make water reports on Bull Springs, Pine Springs, and see what was up with a huge catchment just off Trail #3 at the wilderness boundary.

Bull Springs Trail #100. The climb up to Bull Springs was pretty in the early morning light. Found a few flowers. Photographed a few landscapes. Someone had done some recent maintenance; a volunteer crew is my guess based on the log entry at the trailhead. Thanks so much! My planning for this trip went a little awry when I got to the vicinity of Bull Springs. The topo map, and the “HAZ Area Water” show Bull Springs well inside the actual large eastern switchback of the trail. I mucked around there way too long, bushwhacking into that area to try to find the spring. I plan these hikes in great detail, but I missed two important details about the location of the spring. First, there are two waypoints on HAZ for the location of the spring. One on the official route and one in the “HAZ Area Water”. I did not take with me the one on the official route. Second, the trail on the topo map is very different from the official route, and it is clearly conceptual, sketched in by a hurried geographer, I think, and the location of Bull Springs on the map suffered from the same error. I might have found the spring if I just looked on the other side of the trail once. So, sadly, no meaningful water report, just a warning. The climb down from Juniper Mesa to Bull Springs has been the subject of many complaints, regarding rocks and steepness. All true. The climb up really is no problem.

Juniper Mesa Trail #20. I only hiked a short distance west along Trail #20, just to Trail #3. At one point, as the wind whistled over my head, I realized I was just a few feet from the ridgeline, and If I went up there, I might get some views. Indeed, there are some great views in this section out over the valley.

Oaks and Willows Trail #3. I turned right at the intersection, and began heading steeply down along an ancient road, along an unmaintained fence. In a short distance, the road turned left and began to follow a sweet, relaxing ravine. My mission was to visit the Pine Spring at the trailhead, but clearly the point of this trail was the journey along this ravine. It is beautiful with stands of Ponderosa Pine leaning over the trail, grasslands, and lovely smells. This was by far the most beautiful hike of my week. I checked out the troughs at the spring. Both were full and a small trickle overflowed from the lower one. I could not divine how the upper tank filled, but it must be through the muck at the bottom. I pulled the “animal escape ramp” out of the muck and put it back where it would do some good.

Having had some lunch, I headed the 5.5 miles back along Trail #3 to my car at the other end. Once up on the mesa, the landscape is flat in all directions. It would be great dry camping. Then the trail heads over the south side of the mesa and down getting progressively steeper and rockier. I think it is no better than the top section of Trail #100 in the steepness and rockiness department, so pick your poison going down from the mesa. I visited the catchment just outside the wilderness boundary. It is a huge installation, but the water collected goes into a 2” pipe and disappears underground. I can only surmise it supports water use lower down at the O RO Ranch, west of the trail.
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Pine Springs
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
I photographed a few flowers, but it is not overwhelming. Astragalus, verbena/vervain, wholeleaf paint brush, dandelion, and creeping oregon grape.

dry Bull Spring Dry Dry
Actually, the spring might not be dry, but it is not at the coordinates indicated in the top of the water report, nor at the coordinates shown on the USGS map. It MIGHT be at the coordinates shown with a waypoint on the official route, N34.94603 W-112.92937, but I did not have that point with me. There is nothing but dense brush at N34.94724 W-112.93046. Perhaps someone could verify.

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Pine Springs Dripping Dripping
Both stock tanks full. The lower one was dripping a little.
1 archive
Apr 14 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Apache Creek Wild Explore, AZ 
Apache Creek Wild Explore, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Apr 14 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Backpack23.60 Miles 2,750 AEG
Backpack23.60 Miles1 Day   5 Hrs   37 Mns   
2,750 ft AEG23 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
There are two ways to get to the Apache Creek Trail #9905. I drove to both ends to check them out, connecting by driving the length of FR95 which is a good road, but I was glad I had 4WD, as there are 4 running streams to cross.

You can start at the north end at the Graver Wash #9904 Trailhead. As indicated in previous reports, the last bit of FR95A is not very nice, but it was no problem in my Jeep Cherokee 4x4. Or you can start at the south end, from FR95B. The three miles of FR95B from Stringtown Wash to the trailhead would be possible but very challenging in my Cherokee 4x4. I think a stock Wrangler could do it no problem. I chose to walk it.

Walking in from Stringtown Wash, once you get to the intersection of FR95B/95A, the corner of the wilderness, the countryside becomes very pleasant. Upon entering the wilderness at the trailhead (there is a sign there now), it gets even better. In mid-April, there was filterable water in the stream at the trailhead.

Climbing to the first pass on trail #9905, I found the trail well marked by cairns, and the forest a pleasant mix of alligator juniper, prickly pear cactus, scrub oak, and pinyon pine. The trail drops to Apache Creek at 2.4 miles from the trailhead. There is good camping here and for the next mile or so along the trail.

I continued following the trail north, as it follows along the wilderness boundary. In mid-April, this section was OK, but not very exciting to me. It is a broad valley bottom, and spring does not seem to have arrived yet. The walking is easy, and there are many creek crossings. At the intersection with Graver Wash Trail #9904, I turned around and returned to the point where Apache Creek and the trail diverge.

This time I followed the creek off-trail upstream 0.7 miles to “The Swimmin’ Hole,” near which I spent a very pleasant no-trace night. In the morning I was serenaded by owls and woodpeckers. It was an easy off-trail route. Going upstream I stayed mostly to the north of the creek and going downstream I stayed mostly to the south of the creek. The going is much easier to the south of the creek.

On day 2, I hiked back out to my car, about 6.6 miles including FR95B.

I drove north on FR95, encountering 5 cattle who blocked the road and stared at me expectantly, as though I would offer them something to eat. After a couple gentle beeps of my horn, they wandered off. Coming around to the Graver Wash #9904 trailhead, I hiked down to the intersection with Apache Creek Trail, effectively closing the loop.

So, which is the best way to the middle? It is a tough call. I thought the scenery of coming in from the south superior to coming in from the north. However, coming in from the north is much easier, flatter hiking.
Fauna
Fauna [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Black Bear
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
Nothing worth photographing.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Apache Creek - Apache Creek Wilderness Medium flow Medium flow
There was plenty of water in the creek almost everywhere, but it was easily crossed without getting wet.
Apr 02 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Hell's Hole Trail #284 - Salome WildernessGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 02 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking11.00 Miles 3,000 AEG
Hiking11.00 Miles   7 Hrs   45 Mns   1.91 mph
3,000 ft AEG   2 Hrs    Break15 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I’ve had my eye on this hike for almost 2 years. Glad I finally did it, as it is a new favorite. Getting to the trailhead is nice and can be accomplished with any car. There are no restrooms nor water at the trailhead.

When I started out at 6:45 am, it was a comfortable 36°F. The trail heads up, sometimes steeply, sometimes gently on an ancient two-track in a serene forest of ponderosa pine, Douglas fir, juniper, and manzanita. The coyotes and squirrels were chattering away. I love this kind of forest, with its soft trail and smells, as it reminds me of Washington where I first started hiking. Within 15 minutes, I was at the top of the first pass, a climb of about 300’.

There are lots of interesting little flowers, including manzanita. The trail descends about 500’ from the first pass before leveling out, and then dropping again to the first crossing of Workman’s Creek. Just before crossing the creek, there is a tent site and fireplace right in the middle of the trail that others have mentioned. You can rock hop across the creek or use the footlog. I tried both and stayed dry.

Across the creek and up the hill a short distance, there are many good campsites that don’t put you in the trail or right on the creek. There were several bluejays there. Past these sites, the trail enters the wilderness, and you won’t see water again until you reach Workman’s Creek again at Hell’s Hole.

After about 2 ¼ hours hiking, I reached the Boyer Trail intersection. There are campsites here, and it is very flat, but you might have to move a lot of rocks. It would be muddy when wet. There are good views into the Hells Hole, which is the canyon of the Workman’s Creek. After about a half hour on the plateau, the trail begins its descent to Workman’s Creek. I counted 20 switchbacks altogether, although 3 or 4 were really short. It is about 1000’ descent on good trail.

Others have commented on the overgrowth of the trail. It is mostly scrub oak. I did not encounter anything nasty like catclaw. Some really nice person has done quite a bit of brushing on the trail here, so the oak only closes in about 3 places on the way down. If this was you, thank you so much! It is very do-able, even with a pack.

Once at the creek, there is a pretty little waterfall next to a clear pool, and a little ways downstream are several quite suitable campsites. This is my new favorite place.

The trip back up the hill isn’t too bad with a daypack but would be less pleasant with a full overnight kit. Still, it is less than an 6% grade for 1000’. Quite reasonable.

Past the crossing of Workman’s Creek on the way back, the climb up to the last pass before the trailhead got a little tedious. There I ran into the first person I had seen all day, coming in and moving fast with a daypack. We did not stop to talk.

When I arrived back at the parking lot, there were 4 vehicles parked there, which was a surprise, since I had only seen one person. Looking at the stickers on the cars, I’m guessing they were canyoneers, and were on there way down Salome Creek, Reynolds Creek, or Workman’s Creek and back up the way I came.
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Workman Creek
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
See my pictures. A few flowers starting to bloom.
Mar 19 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Backpack avatar Mar 19 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Backpack24.40 Miles 4,301 AEG
Backpack24.40 Miles1 Day   6 Hrs   3 Mns   
4,301 ft AEG22 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
On the weekend of March 19-20, I hiked Passage 1 of the AZT, from Montezuma Pass south to the border, then north to Parker Canyon Lake. My lovely wife and her friend dropped me off at the pass, and they were still there when I returned a couple of hours later. They had walked up Coronado peak, and when they got back, the parking lot was closed off to clear a space for a helicopter to land as part of a rescue operation.

I continued on north, climbing to the summit of Miller Peak, and then hiking on just a little beyond Bathtub Spring to camp just before dark. I camped in the lee of the ridge, but the wind was really noisy, and coupled with the high elevation, I did not sleep well.

Sunday morning, I got up at dawn and discovered how difficult it is to light an alcohol stove at 38 degrees. Got it going, got my breakfast, and continued on to the lake.

Overall, the trail is in great shape. Just a few trees down in Sunnyside Canyon and just above. Access to both trailheads is easy by car. There were some tiny snow patches in the shady north facing slopes near Miller Peak, but nothing even remotely difficult. There might be a little more now. The weather came in just as I got to Parker Canyon Lake, and left at least a dusting of snow at higher elevations.

Compared to all the Sonoran desert I have been haunting lately, this area was a pleasure to visit. Lots of oaks, Douglas Fir, Ponderosa Pine, and Junipers made for a nice forest at the higher elevation. On the other hand, going uphill above 7000’ is always a challenge for this old guy.

We did pretty well hitting our rendezvous time at the marina. I was 10 minutes early and my wife was 25 minutes early.
Culture
Culture [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] HAZ - Selfie
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Miller Peak
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
Feb 12 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Cabeza BM - High PointSouthwest, AZ
Southwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 12 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking13.00 Miles 1,900 AEG
Hiking13.00 Miles   8 Hrs   5 Mns   2.48 mph
1,900 ft AEG   2 Hrs   50 Mns Break15 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
Before I left on this adventure, I reread the first chapter of The Secret Knowledge of Water by Craig Childs. He describes the Cabeza Prieta in fascinating and very personal detail. It was excellent preparation for this walk. In addition, I registered for my Barry Goldwater Range Permit, and checked in the night before.

It is a long drive across the Barry Goldwater in the dark. Although the road is usually excellent, at times 4WD was of great help in the sand. I am including a hand mapped GPS route of the drive that I followed on the way in. It is accurate. My recorded track of the drive failed.

I departed the car at the wilderness boundary at 7:45 AM. Travel on the road is very quick. The road is extensively driven by border patrol agents. While it detracts from the wilderness experience, it makes the route in exceptionally easy to follow.

There is evidence of lots of wildlife. I never got close enough to see what the flocks of birds were, but they startled me repeatedly when they would all fly up together. Lots of bird tracks, coyote tracks, and javelina tracks in the road. I was unsuccessful in stalking a javelina that crossed my path. Higher up, especially in the canyon to the peak, there are lots of bighorn droppings. This refuge is primarily to protect the population of bighorn.

Leaving the wash, I had a little trouble finding the right canyon to climb up. Sloppy navigation on my part. The correct canyon is an easy walk/scramble. It is like a rugged stairway. Not overgrown and not many tall waterfalls that must be gotten around.

My turnaround time arrived before I reached the summit. I was about 500’ and more or less an hour short of it. It was too bad, but the canyon is quite beautiful and worth the climb. The round trip is nearly 14 miles, as it turns out, right at the limit of a one-day journey for me. The climb down is not difficult, but you do have to watch out for large rocks that shift under your weight. Mostly it was a straightforward walk alternately following sheep paths and the rugged stairway.

Once down on the bajada, I followed a beeline shown in the official route, and then followed the CBP jeep tracks all the way back to my car. A gentle breeze mitigated the unseasonable 80°+ temps in the flats. I would rate this hike higher, but the 5-mile approach is tedious, while the climb is beautiful.
Feb 05 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Mount Ajo PeakSouthwest, AZ
Southwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 05 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking7.64 Miles 2,451 AEG
Hiking7.64 Miles   7 Hrs   23 Mns   1.18 mph
2,451 ft AEG      53 Mns Break15 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Compared to many of the wilderness areas in Arizona, this one is not at all lonely. Although it is far from metropolitan centers, the wilderness is inside Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, so the road is good enough for a car, parking is plentiful, and there is a restroom at the trailhead. I saw about 10 hikers and 10 trail crew on my trek.

Before dawn, it was 28 degrees and breezy, so I put on my windbreaker for the first part of the hike. By midafternoon, as I hiked out, I was too warm in my long-sleeve poly shirt.

I was surprised how lush the vegetation is here. Especially as you hike up the Bull Pasture Trail, you notice the dense growth. Throughout the walk, I noticed all kinds of cactus; the namesake organ pipe cactus is not the only cactus here, perhaps not even the main cactus. There was lots of saguaro and ocotillo. Several kinds of cholla were rampant: teddy-bear, chain fruit, and cane cholla. There were occasional prickly pear, agave and yucca as well.

The path beyond the end of the maintained trail at Bull Pasture is pretty easy to follow, although I got off track a couple of times when I wasn’t paying attention. Follow the official GPS route, and you will not go wrong. The climb up the ravine in the field of scree is not especially fun, and after clearing it, it continued to gnaw at me as I headed for the peak. To save energy for the climb back down the scree field, I stopped my climb about 400’ short of the summit. My climb down the scree field was slow and careful, and it worked out fine.

I highly recommend this hike, although I think the Estes Canyon trail is not worth the additional half mile it adds.
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Estes Canyon
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation None
None yet, but should be spectacular when the cacti are in bloom.

dry Estes Canyon Dry Dry
Dry
Jan 22 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Signal MountainSouthwest, AZ
Southwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 22 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking12.60 Miles 1,290 AEG
Hiking12.60 Miles   7 Hrs   16 Mns   2.31 mph
1,290 ft AEG   1 Hour   49 Mns Break12 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Summary: Highly recommended remote wilderness adventure with wild horses to be seen.

The Signal Mountain Wilderness (BLM) does not have any defined trails. Signal Mountain itself, rarely climbed, is at the heart of this wilderness. Exposures, poor rock, and class 3-4 ratings are beyond my skills. However, the wilderness has a lot of washes which are mostly walkable without a lot of falls and are for the most part not clogged with Palo Verde trees.

I sat down with aerial photos and mapping software and laid out a 12-13 mile circuit around the mountain on my GPS. I thought I could do it in about 8 hours, which proved to be generous. I set myself target waypoints every hour, so I would know (and my wife watching my progress via satellite would know) if I was on schedule to make it home for dinner.

About half the trek is walking along washes, which is easy walking, and about half is up and down walking perpendicular to the washes, which is more work. The views are better when above the washes. Walking perpendicular to the washes, I worked on setting a bearing to the next waypoint and walking towards it. This is a skill I learned as a youngster, and usually is not needed when following the GPS track. However the washes regularly force you off your track, and you can drift off course if you are not careful. The passes from one drainage to the next were pretty easy to navigate. The game trails tend to pick the best route over the passes.

In the course of my walk, I saw no one. I think I may have had the entire 13,000 acre Signal Mountain Wilderness to myself. Probably the adjacent Woolsey Peak 64,000 acres as well. This is a wild place. In the middle of winter, there were no flowers to see, but I had coyotes howling at me in the morning, crows watching me eat my lunch, and wild horses who were none too happy to see me. They continually hissed at me. I’ve never heard that sound from domestic horses. The horses seem to occupy the washes to the south and west of the main ridgeline, and rarely travel to the north and east of it. There was a huge pile of horse manure at the top of the last pass I crossed, as though saying, “This is as far as we go”. I saw evidence of deer, and one horn from a big-horned sheep.

There are two ways to drive here from the gas compression plant on Old Route 80 at Agua Caliente Road. Both are high clearance when dry with 4WD highly recommended. Coming out via the route north around Webb Mountain, there was one particularly long and steep section coming out of the wash that I don’t think I could have made in 2 wheel drive. I recorded the route south of Webb Mountain last week while visiting Woolsey. The two driving routes, as well as my walking route, are loaded to HAZ.

I was disappointed to see tire tracks in the wash leading from my starting point for over a mile inside the wilderness. On the other hand, the only litter I saw within the wilderness were two mylar balloons that had drifted from far away, and crash-landed here.

I found water in some pools along a couple of washes. I have proposed a couple of water sources in HAZ. If you wanted to do an overnight in this wilderness, these could sustain you.
Jan 15 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Woolsey PeakSouthwest, AZ
Southwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 15 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking2.10 Miles 1,100 AEG
Hiking2.10 Miles   2 Hrs   30 Mns   1.24 mph
1,100 ft AEG      48 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I headed out to do this climb on what looked like a beautiful day. However, I did not check the wind forecast. As I passed the windmill at the Buckeye Copper Mine well, I should have contemplated the implications of it spinning vigorously. But I didn't. Started my hike at 8 am from the end of the road that is carved out of the wilderness, and everything seemed good. By 9, I noted in my journal, "It's windier here than I'd like." By 9:20, it was already getting a little more difficult to balance in the wind. I sat and looked at the wind forecast, and saw that it was going to get worse for the next several hours, and decided to abort. With the sun at my back, and down in the washes, it was immensely pleasant. But the gentle breeze coming across the prairie was running smack into Woolsey, and concentrating along the North face, making this just a little unsafe today.

Took the opportunity to have a look at Signal Mountain nearby. I'll be paying that wilderness a visit, soon.

I also took the opportunity to post a GPS track of my preferred route in from Old US 80, by the gas line compressor. This road was definitely high clearance. There were a couple places where I felt better engaging the rear axle lock on my Cherokee, but a brave person with a 2WD high clearance could make it all the way to the trailhead. There wasn't much brush overhanging the road.
Dec 12 2021
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Goat Springs Trail #542Camp Verde, AZ
Camp Verde, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 12 2021
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Hiking7.50 Miles 1,785 AEG
Hiking7.50 Miles   5 Hrs   42 Mns   1.86 mph
1,785 ft AEG   1 Hour   40 Mns Break10 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked linked
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The road to the Goat Springs Trailhead is still very rough. It was fine, but slow going with my 4WD Cherokee. I would not have been happy with just a 2WD high clearance vehicle.

When I arrived at the Goat Springs trailhead around 8:00 AM, my car thermometer said it was 19°. I was dressed for about 10° warmer than that. However, there was no wind, and the sun was out, so it wasn’t bad. The trail register box is still there, but there was no register in it, and part of its support had fallen into disrepair. The forest is an interesting mix. I saw Pinyon Pine, Juniper, Prickly Pear and Century Plant. The trail is in amazingly good shape for such a little used trail.

Overall, the trail is easily followed. At the seeps, you do have to pay attention to the trail making a sharp right and going up, and don’t get misled to follow a way path down the hill.

As reported in the trail guide, the intersection with the Hell Hole Trail is marked with a sign. This area is confusing. The Hell Hole trail actually invisibly takes a sharp right at the sign. If you climb up the hill a little way, you will find the trail. The Goat Springs Trail follows the obvious path forward to the left of the sign and eventually down to the creek crossing.

After the first creek crossing, the trail generally follows a delightful babbling brook back up the hill, crossing it 3 times before getting to the end of the trail. The trail more or less peters out as it climbs onto a V between two streams, which were both dry in December. There are some usable campsites in this area, but it would be a walk back down hill to the running water.

Although there are cross-country routes that climb from here, this is the end of the official trail. At this point, I turned around and went back to hunt for the Hell Hole Trail. It was nice to get back to an area that had not been burned in the recent past. This trip would make a good beginner backpack.

After hiking to Goat Spring Camp, I hiked up the Hell Hole Trail. You can see my guide there for the rest of the story.

dry Goat Camp Spring Dry Dry
No water at the camp, but there was running water less than 1/4 mile downstream.
1 archive
average hiking speed 1.8 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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