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1.1 k triplogs
Aug 07 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Bixler Saddle Trail #72Flagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 07 2021
chumley
Hiking6.64 Miles 1,654 AEG
Hiking6.64 Miles   2 Hrs   36 Mns   2.55 mph
1,654 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Partners partners
John9L
I'd been missing the third leg of Bill's tripod and decided today would make a good day for the attempt. No cheating by coming down from the top though, I wanted to do it the way it was designed.

I've not been able to solve the mystery of the closure of FR 45. It was used as a fire break during the 2009 Twin Fire (a prescribed burn that escaped and threatened the entire mountain and city of Williams before being controlled.) I can envision a post-fire closure due to potential flooding and erosion issues, but I found no information online confirming that. On other forests that have implemented the mandated travel management rule, I've found that roads that access hiking trails are deemed necessary and kept open. This one is an anomaly.

As others have stated, it's a beautiful trail. Well constructed with nice views and a bomber bartelsesque oak forest unlike any other I've seen here. The trailhead is marked as well as the other trifecta of trails on the mountain, but of course it's now inaccessible to all but those who put in the extra effort to hike the old access road.

It's a rough road for sure, but would be passable by a 4wd vehicle with clearance -- and in fact, does appear to get some regular maintenance and driving use either by official vehicles or poachers.

After making the climb, met up with 9L and offered him a shuttle back around to his car. Needless to say, nobody else out on Bixler today! :y:
_____________________
33s over 45s
Jul 28 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Clark Range Loop, CA 
Clark Range Loop, CA
 
Backpack avatar Jul 28 2021
chumley
Backpack59.94 Miles 10,900 AEG
Backpack59.94 Miles5 Days         
10,900 ft AEG
 
1st trip
9L asked me if I'd be interested in this one and despite being off my peak hiking form, I figured, what's a 50-60 mile backpack trip? The clincher was that I couldn't refuse his offer to drive somewhere (anywhwere, ever), so I shuffled my calendar to make it work. After looking at the route, I proposed starting with two shorter days with optional day hikes rather than knocking out one big uphill day right out of the gate. I'm pretty happy with how that turned out, especially with the abundant monsoon moisture that dumped on us each day of the trip. I could have easily spent another night or two along the spectacular Merced River and do a couple of basecamp dayhikes from there. Perhaps another visit is in order...

Day 1 - Mono Meadow to Clark Fork (6.4 mi, 1200 aeg)
We got started around 2pm on a rather warm sunny afternoon. Mono Meadow was dry enough for mud-free crossing. We took quick breaks at the first creek crossing (west fork Illilouette?) and at Illilouette, where we were able to hop across keeping our feet dry. From here it's all uphill, and we knocked out the remaining 3 miles to camp without much problem. Shortly after we got camp setup, some storms rolled through allowing for a pleasant pitter-patter for an early evening nap. The skies cleared and we settled in for an enjoyable couple hours around the fire.

Day 2 - Clark Fork to Upper Merced Pass Lake (7.8 mi, 2100 aeg)
With another short day we slept in and were in no rush to get started. This was another all-climb day but the trail is extremely moderate. It's not typical Sierra hiking, just nicely wooded, not much granite, with few views. Along the way we chatted with some SAR folks who were out looking for a hiker who had been missing for 5 days. They informed us that the SAR base was set up at our planned camp at Lower Merced Pass Lake, so that threw a little wrinkle into our day. Fortunately, when we stopped to chat with them, one of the searchers pointed us to a fantastic alternative at Upper Merced Pass Lake. We set up camp with plans for a good day hike, but before we could get started, the skies opened up with one of the best storms I've ever camped in. Hail and lightning, with at least 2"-3" of rainfall resulting in flooding that had both of us relocating our tent locations, and not a whole lot of actual sleep during afternoon storm naptime!

Dayhike - Buena Vista Crest (3.5 mi, 1000 aeg)
When the rain finally stopped after a few hours, we tried to dry some things out and I decided we had enough daylight to make a modified dayhike to the Buena Vista Crest. I had hopes to hike more of the crest and drop into the Hoover Lakes, but we had to cut that short. Nonetheless, we climbed above camp which opened up some outstanding post-storm views across the Clark Range and down the Illilouette valley back to Half Dome, Hoffman, and Clouds Rest. This is a very worthy side trip. Despite the torrential rain earlier, 9L got his merit badge by getting the fire started for another evening of drying out. An orphaned hiker latched on to us and seemed happy to have some company. He spent the evening making up for apparently not having spoken to anybody for several days. :-$

Day 3 - Upper Merced Pass Lake to Triple Fork (14.2 mi, 3200 aeg)
This was always going to be our biggest ascent day as we needed to get over 11,200 foot Red Peak Pass. It started with a moderate climb up to Lower Ottoway Lake, which is an absolute stunning alpine lake. From there the climb begins in earnest, passing by Upper Ottoway Lake above the treeline. The final 500 feet follows switchbacks through a talus chute that features construction as nice as any trail I have ever hiked.

Cresting the pass there was a group of 12 boyscouts. Kelly (our chatty magnet hiker) and I reached the pass when one of the scout leaders commented that it was suddenly crowded up there. I politely pointed out that people numbers 13 and 14 were not the ones who made it crowded. :sweat: Following my comments about lawsuits, abuse, and surprise that the scouts still exist :roll: we quickly made our way down the north side of the pass, leaving the actual crowd behind. Until camp in LYV, that group was more people than all the others we encountered combined.

Heading down Red Peak Pass, the first couple of miles of trail are above the treeline with stunning views and unique red colored rock amongst the typical gray granite. Again, the trail construction through this boulder field is impressive. The forecast called for strong storms again today, beginning around noon, and we had made a solid effort to get over the pass before then. The clouds were building and thunder rumbled around us. Rain was visible in the distance and a few drops landed from time to time, but we threaded the needle and were able to get well below the treeline before the heavy rain began.

Fully geared up and splashing through the rain, dodging lightning strikes and ducking wind, we reached our planned night 3 camp. With nowhere to shelter and no possibility of setting up camp in the storm, we opted to just keep walking, hoping to knock off another mile or three until the storm passed. It didn't pass, but we saw a suitable camp at some point, and the rain had let up enough to get a tent set up without getting soaked. Just in time, too, as a new round of rain came in and it poured for at least another couple of hours.

When the storm cleared, it was another beautiful evening with late day sunlight, clouds and fog, and a river adjacent to camp whose level increased by more than a foot as I filtered water. It took a little longer to get the fire started after this storm, but after some effort, another enjoyable night at camp was at hand.

Day 4 - Triple Fork to LYV (18.4 mi, 800 aeg)
After a morning fire and waiting for the sun to rise high enough to give some time to dry out our wet tents and footprints, we packed up and headed downstream. It wasn't far before the trail drops to where the various forks join to create the start of the Merced River. This is an absolutely spectacular drop and the next 15 miles is as nice as any I've ever experienced in Yosemite.

Waterfalls, cascades, lakes, placid pools, forests, granite cliffs, creeks, and views in every direction. We took a break at Washburn Lake, and stopped briefly at the Merced Ranger station and Merced Lake High Sierra Camp, both of which were completely deserted :y: due to Covid. Below Merced Lake, we opted to continue past one of our night four camp options with the mandatory camp now being at Little Yosemite Valley due to year-round camping restrictions.

Below Merced Lake the river carves a deeper gorge and passes over a couple of huge cascades. The trail takes a high route above one of the narrow stretches and here is where the rain began. Unlike the past two days though, it only rained lightly for a half hour or so before stopping altogether.

In addition to the miles piling up on the day, the last couple of miles were really devastating as the 2014 Meadow Fire has completely decimated the valley and shows very little sign of recovery. Tree cover returned just minutes before arriving at the campground, where our late arrival made finding a great spot challenging. Nonetheless, I was able to do enjoy some swimming in the Merced and a pleasant night sleep, surrounded by hundreds of people who have apparently never stayed up past 8pm.

Day 5 - LYV to Mono Meadow (9.0 mi, 2600 aeg)
With many of our Half Dome hiker neighbors getting up before dawn, our exit day started early, heading in the opposite direction as the occasional dayhikers heading toward Half Dome. There were only two others at Nevada Falls, which is by far the best way to enjoy it. From here, we climbed up toward the Panorama Cliffs rather than heading down to the valley where the masses could be found. The climb was more pleasant than I was expecting and we quickly dropped down into the Illilouette Creek drainage. We encountered a rare sight (twice) along the way. Dogs! Unfortunately, SAR was still actively searching for the missing hiker, and two teams had trained dogs working with them. It's always a surprise to see man's best friend on the trail in the backcountry of a national park. After a quick break at the creek we retraced our steps from five days earlier on the final climb back to the trailhead.

After a few minutes to get organized, we climbed into the HMS 9L and began the long drive back to Arizona.
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33s over 45s
Jul 28 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Sentinal Taft Loop, CA 
Sentinal Taft Loop, CA
 
Hiking avatar Jul 28 2021
chumley
Hiking5.83 Miles 1,438 AEG
Hiking5.83 Miles   2 Hrs   21 Mns   2.63 mph
1,438 ft AEG      8 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Partners partners
John9L
We arrived in the park at around 8am and after stopping by the permit office in Wawona we drove up the Glacier Point Road. With plenty of time to spend before heading out on our backpacking trip, we opted for this tourist loop to get our feet moving.

We were both shocked to find the parking lot full and lines of cars parked along both sides of the road in both directions. So much for a midweek morning when the park requires reservations just to enter! Perhaps it was the record heat that had pushed many visitors up to these higher elevations?

Regardless, we parked up the road and took a shortcut to meet the loop, climbing to the outstanding views provided by Sentinal Dome. Back down we swung around and followed the cliff edge out to Taft Point. This is another winner. Yosimeteeay Falls would look great from here, if only there was at least a trickle flowing over it. But there wasn't. There's a great view of El Cap, and while the Merced snaking through the valley below looked appealing, nothing looked as refreshing as the bright aqua of the pool at the Ahwahnee. Too bougie for me!

We completed the loop and made a quick trip to Glacier Point for a couple of last minute items from the store there and a quick reminder of the views and all that comes with it.
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33s over 45s
Jul 25 2021
chumley
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 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Telegraph Fire Scar, AZ 
Telegraph Fire Scar, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jul 25 2021
chumley
Hiking7.89 Miles 2,222 AEG
Hiking7.89 Miles   4 Hrs   29 Mns   1.80 mph
2,222 ft AEG      6 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Partners partners
John9L
Another delightfully rainy day in the desert! :y:

This one was a bit of a gamble. Radar estimates showed it hadn't received as much rain as other areas, but I took a stab that there'd be flowing water given the burn scar. Despite not having closures in place like other parts of the burn, this is sort of low elevation so I figured I wouldn't be able to get back there until cooler weather to check it out.

Well, in a twist of luck, cooler weather is exactly what happened! And rain. Plenty of wonderful rain. The forecast looked reasonable, and the Flash Flood Warning in effect for the area was noted.

FR 319 is heavily rutted. Even worse than before. Unless there's a rancher that needs access or the TRAL people get involved, I can see this one settling into some extra hiking mileage. The burn here was bad and the runoff is eroding the road with every new storm. I gave up when reaching the 2260 intersection and we walked from there.

The spring area at the end of 2260 was torched, including the big cottonwoods. The whole drainage down suffered the same fate at varying levels of severity. Some of the overgrown thickets that were a challenge before are now easygoing.

Our entire hike in was in a pleasant and lightly running stream. The morning showers had given way to cloudiness and even an occasional splash of sun. When we reached the heart of the wilderness we stayed high on the south side of the creek and followed an old use path down to creek level below the narrows. All of this has burned, but of course the geology hasn't changed, and most of this desert scrub will be back soon enough.

The water was flowing strongly as we headed downstream and explored up some side drainages. Water was deep enough to require bypasses to avoid swimming. A pure delight for midsummer in the desert.

Somewhere along the line, the rain picked up again, and I donned my umbrella. We headed upstream in the creek, somewhat wary of the short stretch that would not allow for an easy exit to higher ground should the water rise quickly. A bit farther upstream we happened upon the magnificent waterfall that enters from the north. I've seen this one flowing before, and it always amazes me for the relatively small area it drains.

After a lunch break by the falls and satisfied with the survey of fire damage, we headed back up toward the top of the slots to begin our trek back to the truck. Seeing the cascade here it was evident the flow of the creek had increased and turned decidedly more turbid. There's not a huge catchment here and the flow was still quite easy for walking, enjoyable really, so we splashed on upstream. As we did so, the rain picked up considerably. I commented to 9L to be aware of the possibility the flow could increase with the heavier rain band.

We stopped at one of the small cascades along the creek to capture a photo when it appeared that a bit more water began to pour over the rocks. Seconds later, and at the same time we both heard the impending rush of water barreling down canyon and quickly climbed out of the creek and up to a safe perch. In what seemed like 15 seconds (but was actually about a minute and a half) the creek had gone from a flow of maybe 5cfs to probably over 100cfs. It crashed over the cascade we were just photographing and filled the entire creek channel we had been hiking in. We would have survived the flow had we been cluelessly unaware and not highly alert for just such an event, but the rush of seeing this occur was also quite exhilarating.

We proceeded upstream staying on the burned banks, crossing where it was narrow enough to jump, until eventually the flow had receded enough to splash in the creek bottom once again. There were more muddy drainages flowing back near the truck, but thankfully the road was still intact for the drive back out to the highway.

There's a lot of sad sights here now with saguaros and cottonwoods that will not return in my lifetime. But other parts will probably be ok in short order. And this day was one for the memory bank, not soon to be forgotten.
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33s over 45s
Jul 24 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Weavers Crosscut Loop, AZ 
Weavers Crosscut Loop, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jul 24 2021
chumley
Hiking8.22 Miles 2,224 AEG
Hiking8.22 Miles   4 Hrs   24 Mns   2.00 mph
2,224 ft AEG      17 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
After a couple of days of rainfall and positively autumnal temperatures, I was watching the morning radar to see where would be a suitable place to go that wouldn't result in an all-day deluge. The rim looked clear, but I opted for the Supes, as it looked as though the rain would move out in the next hour or so, and there's really no place like the Supes in the rain.

This plan seemed extremely questionable on the drive there, as the wall of water we were driving through reduced freeway speeds into the 30s. Alas, Peralta Road did not have any deep water crossings as the washes were dry. The road was flowing nicely however! :sweat:

We set out shortly after the heaviest rain band had ended and got to enjoy the rewards of the monsoon. Waterfalls flowed over the dacite cliffs, and nearly every stain you see on the cliffs on a dry day was flowing today. The clouds came and went, sometimes reducing visibility to near zero, while other times opening up a view.

I haven't hiked this since the Sawtooth Fire, so it was a little shocking to see the destruction on the other side of Fremont Saddle. We were lucky that the clouds broke for a bit and we got the only view of the needle that we saw all day. The rain, fog, and flowing water made the burn area a unique and strangely beautiful sight to behold, especially on the crosscut (btw the route up the xcut from Peralta is largely destroyed, difficult to find and follow. I'm gonna send @bobp out there to build some cairns because it'll be a while before a route is able to be reestablished there).

As expected, Barks was flowing nicely and made for some enjoyable splashing on the return trip. The water continues to flow with the darkened silt of fire runoff and the smell of wet smoke was with us all day. But this rain will only help to sprout the life that will slowly erase that scar.

As always, it was a great day to be out here in lightning-free rain. I think there were 4 cars in the lot when we started and 5 when we finished. That might be normal for a July day. I can't recall hiking in the Supes during the day in midsummer before, but the thermometer didn't crack 72, which I also can't recall happening in July before. Gotta take advantage of such rarities when mother nature serves them up!
_____________________
33s over 45s
2 archives
Jul 17 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
East Clear Creek, AZ 
East Clear Creek, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jul 17 2021
chumley
Hiking6.87 Miles 1,500 AEG
Hiking6.87 Miles   6 Hrs   33 Mns   1.30 mph
1,500 ft AEG   1 Hour   16 Mns Break
 no routes
Partners partners
dyellab
jillyonanadventure
During a camping weekend in the area, we opted to check out an offtrail route I threw together to take advantage of the drastically low levels in the reservoir and enjoy seeing what the East Clear Creek canyon looked like before the dam was built.

What was once a rugged, rocky canyon similar to others nearby has been transformed over the years, filled with sediment from annual runoff resulting in a smooth, flat bottom and easy hiking. Two years of low water has allowed that sediment to sprout with grass and wildflowers, a striking contrast to the surrounding Coconino sandstone canyon walls.

The full-length of the Rock Xing Trail is easily hiked from end-to-end, no longer split into three sections by the fake lake, but featuring a little more AEG from the two crossings since the water level is 70 feet below full pool.

At the east end of the lake, some water remains, which provided a nice respite as we were able to enjoy some quality swim time.
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33s over 45s
Jul 14 2021
chumley
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 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Hidden Valley via Pima CanyonPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 14 2021
chumley
Hiking5.26 Miles 662 AEG
Hiking5.26 Miles   1 Hour   59 Mns   2.77 mph
662 ft AEG      5 Mns Break
 no routes
Partners partners
LindaAnn
I awoke to the sound of heavy rain on my roof and despite the sun having yet to light the eastern sky, opted to take advantage of the first rain of the season and sit outside on the patio to enjoy it. Storms continued to roll through the valley beyond daybreak and the coolest temps since February coaxed me to head for a quick hike once it looked as if the lightning had mostly settled down.

Rainfall gauges and radar estimates led me to Somo, with some hesitant expectation that there would be flowing water in the drainages. No luck upon arrival, but half a mile into the hike the headwaters of the "flash flood" made its way down Pima Wash and suddenly it was flowing nicely. Perfect hike timing! It would have been tough footing going up Pima at this flow level but also would have provided some pretty impressive waterfalls.

But we opted to stay on National to the top and head down the wash giving the flow a chance to recede a bit. Pretty much checked all the boxes for a perfect morning, and a welcome start to the monsoon in the valley.
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33s over 45s
1 archive
Jul 10 2021
chumley
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 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
West Clear Creek, AZ 
West Clear Creek, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jul 10 2021
chumley
Hiking11.30 Miles 4,382 AEG
Hiking11.30 Miles   6 Hrs   47 Mns   1.78 mph
4,382 ft AEG      27 Mns Break
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
John9L
We were planning to do this one the day the Backbone Fire blew up and closed the road. Then the forest closed. Patience is a virtue and we took a raincheck for another date. A little bit low flow and some marginally stagnant pools if you looked hard, but for the most part, as nice as always. The poison ivy seems unaffected by drought but a thorough scrubbing seemed to do the trick. Got buzzed as I stepped over a rattler within a couple hundred yards of the one I saw last year. Never saw him in the knee-deep grass, but upon getting a few feet away noticed blood running down my ankle and what looked like a pair of puncture wounds. Hadn't felt anything, and so far no pain or swelling ... heartbeat picked up a bit but decided to push on. No effects set in so we continued on. At home I did a thorough post-shower inspection and concluded it had to be just a couple of perfectly placed common trail wounds. :sweat: Made for some hike excitement though! :D
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33s over 45s
Jul 05 2021
chumley
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 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Luna Valley SF River, NM 
Luna Valley SF River, NM
 
Hiking avatar Jul 05 2021
chumley
Hiking4.82 Miles 428 AEG
Hiking4.82 Miles   2 Hrs   7 Mns   2.39 mph
428 ft AEG      6 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
With disappointing water flows in the creeks and drainages on our previous days' hikes, I decided to head for what must be the most reliable stream in the area ... the one called a river! I took B83 to B42 and continued to the end of FR 2026U south of the Luna Valley where I headed down a small drainage toward the river.

Would this river more accurately be termed a creek, brook, or stream? Argue amongst yourselves. :sweat:

This is a highly grazed area and I chased a skittish herd of cows downstream until they reached a barbed wire fence that crossed the valley. They watched nervously as I passed them by and they reversed their path to get farther away from me. From here there were still signs of cattle grazing, but far less than the first stretch.

The heat and humidity were a bit oppressive, so I turned around after 2.5 miles, knowing I would have to retrace my steps. Only at the very end did I take a slightly different path back to the truck, making a point to visit the Laney Corral. I saw no sign of the mine marked on old topos and was relieved to close out the weekend by retreating a few miles to higher elevations, cooler temps, clouds and monsoon rains which made for a pleasant afternoon nap in the pines.
Named place
Named place
San Francisco River
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33s over 45s
Jul 04 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Jim Smith Rim, NM 
Jim Smith Rim, NM
 
Hiking avatar Jul 04 2021
chumley
Hiking7.57 Miles 1,406 AEG
Hiking7.57 Miles   3 Hrs   25 Mns   2.33 mph
1,406 ft AEG      10 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners partners
BiFrost
John9L
I drew this one up on the map because I was interested in cooling off at the ~9000 foot elevation and it looked like there would be some decent views from most of it. Only later did we encounter signs that showed a stretch of our route was actually an old trail.

We started near Smith Spring (no sign of water or infrastructure) along FR 4023V. Upon later examination it appears that 4023V is no longer a motor vehicle road under the Gila MVUM so we should have parked at its junction with 385. Next time.

We headed up the draw containing the dry Smith Creek, a pleasant meadow stroll lined with numerous small cattle tanks and plenty of worn tracks to follow. A mile in, near Smith Tank we cut straight west and climbed quickly about 500 feet to an old two track numbered 4002P on maps and followed it north to point 9309. Here we enjoyed great views of Escudilla, where storms were in full swing. From this point we traveled northeast for a mile, following the edge of steep plateau that I decided to call Jim Smith Rim. The views to the north and west were second to none.

We took a lunch break at this spot, a 90-degree corner in the rim where we were at the point sticking farthest north, with 270 degree views across the surrounding landscape. Another mile and a half of rimside hiking toward the southeast brought us to the edge of the plateau with views to Jones Peak and 9334 ... technically the highest point in this area, but one we opted against heading over to it.

It was along this section that we passed the old Jim Smith Trail and noted its route. Views across the nearby Spur Lake Basin and all the way down to the named peaks of the Gila Wilderness were spectacular.

We headed over toward the namesake peak on this hike and the storms that had surrounded us and threatened most of day began to more forcefully inform us to get off the peak. Which we did. In an effort to get down more quickly we took an off-trail route directly into the draw that connected to the Jim Smith Trail. It was a steep and messy descent, but we were happy to be back down in the valley as the sky opened up on us and thunder boomed.

A mile later, soaked and muddy, we were happy to be back in the truck and headed back to camp.

I'd revise the ascent choice and stick to the JS Trail on the way down, but if I'm ever nearby again, the full rim traverse is as nice a hike as I can imagine finding in this area.
Named place
Named place
Escudilla Mountain
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33s over 45s
Jul 04 2021
chumley
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 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Romero - Trout Creeks, NM 
Romero - Trout Creeks, NM
 
Hiking avatar Jul 04 2021
chumley
Hiking3.41 Miles 576 AEG
Hiking3.41 Miles   1 Hour   19 Mns   2.59 mph
576 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
BiFrost
John9L
After some afternoon showers and relaxing at camp, we decided to set a quick shuttle and explore a 3 mile run of the bottom of Romero Creek and continue on down Trout. We put in at the 220 bridge and followed Romero downstream to the junction with Trout Creek and on to our shuttle point where the creek horseshoes just west of Bill Lee Mesa.

Along the way we skirted some private property with a few dwellings that appear to get occasional use, but also appeared to be unoccupied this weekend.

I'd like to see these drainages with more surface water and a little more green grass, but after two years of below normal moisture, this is probably as dry as it ever gets here.
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33s over 45s
Jul 03 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Centerfire Creek, NM 
Centerfire Creek, NM
 
Hiking avatar Jul 03 2021
chumley
Hiking5.29 Miles 943 AEG
Hiking5.29 Miles   3 Hrs   10 Mns   1.94 mph
943 ft AEG      26 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
BiFrost
Goldentrailz
John9L
We spent a refreshing, cool, and occasionally rainy weekend exploring an area mostly unknown to me. With some last minute research, I had penciled in a few options for day hikes in the area, and this one turned out to be a total bust.

My plans to avoid private ranch property were thwarted early on and we settled for a roundabout option that was hot and steep. The onset of the monsoon had brought with it thick humidity of which none of us was particularly accustomed to. We kept hoping the clouds would build and bring a relieving shower, but it wasn't happening, and we opted to bail on any attempt to reach something that might be a creek and make the smart decision to return.

This is one of the most overgrazed areas I have ever hiked through, and somehow it's still pretty. I wonder if it was given 5 years to recover without grazing if it wouldn't be one of the most beautiful places in the west. :-k Alas, such a dream is unlikely to ever occur.

John and Karl took a different route back, while I plotted a route that took us across the private property that was out of view of the homes and hopefully not impactful on those who reside there. We definitely got caught on a trailcam watering the dogs from a ranch tank :oops: . On our short drive back to camp we finally got that rain we had hoped for over the past couple hours!
Geology
Geology
Mud
Named place
Named place
Escudilla Mountain
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33s over 45s
2 archives
Jun 19 2021
chumley
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 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Gentry Knoll Loop, AZ 
Gentry Knoll Loop, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jun 19 2021
chumley
Hiking8.31 Miles 990 AEG
Hiking8.31 Miles   3 Hrs   56 Mns   2.58 mph
990 ft AEG      43 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
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BiFrost
Goldentrailz
John9L
Backbone blew up Friday afternoon, and literally changed our plans while we were driving north. We had to scrap our plans and come up with an alternative on the fly. Out of the path of the fire we managed to find a great spot to camp and put together a nice loop for our Saturday linking Gentry canyon to Double Cabin, O'Haco, and back with a little break at the puddle once known as Knoll Lake.

Smoke was evident all weekend, and ash "snowed" down on us. Blustery winds had us wondering about the fate of Pine and Strawberry, so upon returning to civilization we were pleased to learn the fire lines had held.
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33s over 45s
1 archive
Jun 11 2021
chumley
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 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Hellsgate 37 ( South ) - Smoky HollowPayson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 11 2021
chumley
Hiking3.27 Miles 175 AEG
Hiking3.27 Miles   1 Hour   28 Mns   2.28 mph
175 ft AEG      2 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
JoelHazelton
Jonnybackpack
After some logistical hiccups we got started on the trail a bit before 2. There were a couple of quads parked at the trailhead whose riders we guessed were on a day hike. The heat of the day took its toll, and I was happy to be carrying my shade umbrella.

About half a mile from the bottom we encountered an unusual find ... a cooler, abandoned right in the middle of the trail. Still cold and full of food we learned later it had been left by the two quad riders, two utes from Young. Apparently, after 6 hours of hiking they had given up and decided the finish the hike without the cooler. They also left their ice cream containers on the trail, as I'm sure those too, were quite heavy.

Their quads were gone when we returned to the trailhead so apparently they survived. Numerous signs of their presence here had also survived, which is always a bit disheartening to see, and somewhat unexpected in such a remote area.

Despite the stain of their visit, I was happy to have finally set foot on this trail, which has been on my map for several years.
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33s over 45s
May 31 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Crescent Lake, AZ 
Crescent Lake, AZ
 
Hiking avatar May 31 2021
chumley
Hiking1.00 Miles 20 AEG
Hiking1.00 Miles
20 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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dyellab
Goldentrailz
jillyonanadventure
It's dry and dusty and after a few days away from home we contemplated a refreshing swim. As it turned out, the lake was low and uninviting for non-canines so we just enjoyed walking the shore for a bit. The bald eagle's nest near the lake appeared to be unoccupied. Not sure if it was just out hunting or if it's not active anymore. Poofy clouds were a nice surprise and inspired hope of a wet monsoon.
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33s over 45s
May 30 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Greens Peak, AZ 
Greens Peak, AZ
 
Scenic Drive avatar May 30 2021
chumley
Scenic Drive
Scenic Drive
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
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dyellab
Goldentrailz
jillyonanadventure
Camped in the vicinity, we decided to take a short trip up the mountain for some views. It was crazy windy and cold, but the scattered rain and clouds made for some nice light as our planet rotated out of the sun's illumination marking the conclusion of another day. This one was pretty good. :)
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33s over 45s
May 30 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Northern Apache Forest, AZ 
Northern Apache Forest, AZ
 
Hiking avatar May 30 2021
chumley
Hiking6.91 Miles 1,109 AEG
Hiking6.91 Miles   4 Hrs   31 Mns   1.90 mph
1,109 ft AEG      53 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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dyellab
Goldentrailz
jillyonanadventure
The White Mountains of Arizona don't compare to those in New Hampshire or the range along the California/Nevada border, but they're a pretty special place in our state. A few notable trails and lakes draw the bulk visitors, but much of the terrain features open grassy meadows or nicely spaced aspen and fir woodlands with meandering creeks and streams.

We decided to take advantage of this special landscape to wander aimlessly across the forest for a few pleasant hours.
Named place
Named place
Udall Park
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33s over 45s
May 16 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Bear Canyon 2, AZ 
Bear Canyon 2, AZ
 
Hiking avatar May 16 2021
chumley
Hiking5.00 Miles 800 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles   2 Hrs   33 Mns   2.27 mph
800 ft AEG      21 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
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John9L
Mave1878
patrickakabird
After a pleasant canyon hike on Saturday, we decided we wanted more so Sunday we headed out to our exit point the day before and dropped back in to continue downstream. It was another day of splashy pools, geology, grassy meadows and pleasant temperatures typical of rim country at this time of year.

We hit Fred at the flood-eroded 95 crossing and climbed up and over to Pinchot before heading up Houston to Aspen and calling it a day.

At this end of the loop we opted to make our escape from the rim via 95 and the choice was rewarded with a speedy, smooth, and traffic-free exit to pavement.
Culture
Culture
HAZ - Hike HAZard
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33s over 45s
May 15 2021
chumley
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 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Bear Canyon, AZ 
Bear Canyon, AZ
 
Hiking avatar May 15 2021
chumley
Hiking8.82 Miles 1,200 AEG
Hiking8.82 Miles   5 Hrs   7 Mns   1.81 mph
1,200 ft AEG      15 Mns Break
 no routes
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dyellab
Goldentrailz
jillyonanadventure
John9L
Mave1878
patrickakabird
We spent the weekend camped on the rim and decided to duck into Bear Canyon for a few miles to stretch our legs on Saturday. The water was pleasant and the terrain was fairly easygoing. None of the boxes required swimming, with just one where tippytoes couldn't keep the boys dry. The ladies turned around and headed back while the rest of us continued downstream. The geology was superior after our group split, but we learned later that the girls won the day with a canyon namesake sighting and a short standoff with one of the dogs :o

We climbed out at a spot that in real life didn't quite match up with how easy it looked on the topo. We dropped down to Aspen Spring for a snack and headed up the trail for a couple of easy miles before making another steep canyon crossing to get back to our camp.
Flora
Flora
Mountain Parsley
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33s over 45s
2 archives
May 13 2021
chumley
avatar

 Guides 81
 Routes 689
 Photos 16,010
 Triplogs 1,610

48 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
The Tonto, AZ 
The Tonto, AZ
 
Canyoneering avatar May 13 2021
chumley
Canyoneering25.51 Miles 1,000 AEG
Canyoneering25.51 Miles   23 Hrs   16 Mns   1.10 mph
1,000 ft AEG
Basic Canyoneering - Scrambling; easy climbing/downclimbing; frequent hand use; rope recommended; easy exit
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
The Tonto travels for over 70 miles from the shaded pine forest of the Mogollon Rim northeast of Payson until it drains into the Salt River as it cuts through the desert at Roosevelt Dam. Much of it is difficult to access as the water cuts a 1500 foot deep gorge through rugged mountains. Some sections could arguably be considered as remote and wild as any in the state.

The ideal windows for visitation vary depending on the stretch. Heat, cold, flooding, and low flow or complete lack of water complicate the best laid plans to visit this place. For me, it's a multi-year project to see all of it, and I'm far from there yet. But whenever I have a chance to peel off another few miles that I haven't seen, I jump at the opportunity.

For each photo that makes it look amazing, there are 20 or more that tell a different story. But who wants to see those!? :sweat:
Culture
Culture
Ghost?
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33s over 45s
1 archive
average hiking speed 2.12 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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